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Archive for January 2011

CES 2011 has delivered the goods on tablets, mobile phones, next-gen PCs and much more. What’s the highest-impact news from the show?

Callum Finlayson, Management consultant at AP Benson says:
«There was nothing that really stood out significantly in my opinion. Nothing radical, nothing’s changed, no breakthroughs, no amazing innovation. The most high impact things were probably the Motoroal Atrix (as everyone and their dog is saying) and the confirmation that everyone in the industry is now committed to tablets, but nobody’s quite got it right yet.»

Madrixo Levorne, Graphic Design Professional and Program/Game Developer:
«I think that it’s some advanced developed hologram device able to reproduce realistic fully animated projections.»

Ivan Law, Team Lead – 365 Initiative at Canadian Undergraduate Technology Conference counts:
«Some would say the release of Android 3.0, or Honeycomb for tablet devices or the proliferation of dual core Android cell phones such as the Motorola Atrix or the LG Optimus 2X. However, I think the highest impact news was that Ford launched the new electric Focus at CES2011, marking this the first CES ever where a car company decided to launch a major new product.»

Balaji Lakshmanan, CTO at Vast Communications:
«I think the blackberry tablet (playbook), LG pen touch multi board and Sony 3d TV stood out.»

You’re welcome with your comments!

Best Regards,
Kristina Kozlova
Altabel Group
www.altabel.com

Facebook says its new Messages service is no Gmail killer, and Google’s CEO has said he is not concerned. Bellow you may find some LI members’ opinions about this topic.

«I feel no, Facebook is one of the best networking site to communicate and keep in touch everyday.»
Sean Lopez

«Yes! Some people think FB messaging service will replace email in the future….»
Kate Jillings

«Well, inertia is a powerful force. It takes some getting for people to switch e-mail services, especially when it comes to the hassles of changing your contact information with friends, banks, credit cards and other organizations that use your address. Even then, the possibility cannot be ruled out. Facebook already has a treasure trove of personal information and a huge messaging platform. Throw email into the mix and you have a deadly combination. And there’s also the social element: FB knows very well who your friends are and how closely you’re connected to them; it can very well do a pretty good job of figuring out which personal emails you want to read most and prioritize them accordingly. With more than 500 million users, FB is a giant much bigger than all email providers. If it can manage to integrate the new messaging system with the main interface, I think FB will get even “stickier” than it is and will make people keep their distance from the privacy-invading behemoth.»
Abdul Rahim Hasan

«It would be death for Google to say that it *is* worried, whether it is or not. New technology does not kill old technology immediately. It layers on top of old ways of doing things. Email is not, despite what Facebook says, dead. Facebook is engaging in a little psyche-out with Google, pretending that it’s David to Google’s Goliath, when it hasn’t been David for years. Watch, in 5 years as Facebook becomes MySpace and some new, even cooler platform takes over the zeitgeist and we all forget about Mark Z.»
Erica Friedman

«Absolutely not. While Facebook has the user base, their current platform apparently does not have the ability to support a real email service. I’ve been using the “New Messages” for a few weeks now, and my conclusion about it is “Seriously? That’s it?”»
Brian Altenhofel

«I am concerned about the privacy issues that are going to come up…not at an IT level, but because people have begun to let down their guard where they’d have never done so like this in a shopping mall meeting someone and talking, or a cafe, or elsewhere. Facebook does not seem secure to me in that sense rather than the security of their messaging system. I’m seeing droves of people joining facebook then baring their souls and their everyday existence…then realizing you cannot take that back. One thing you must say is that communication is still more or less in writing but not for long. Voice recognition etc is going to become more common. So facebook may serve a purpose as it’s more visual than verbal for many folks and the others still require more written communication. Like it or not, many people find that requires a little work!»
Heather Vitaglione

Maybe you have something to add?

Best Regards,
Kristina Kozlova
Altabel Group
www.altabel.com

The beta of Microsoft’s Office 365, its suite of business-focused, cloud-based applications, is out, and there are plenty of things to like about it. Here are three reasons small businesses should give the beta a try.

Exchange in the cloud
Microsoft Exchange offers considerable benefits for small businesses, including security, the ability to customize how people are allowed to get their email, archived email, and much more.
But maintaining Exchange server hardware and software is beyond the reach of many businesses. Office 365 offers Exchange in the cloud, so that a small business need not concern itself with getting and keeping Exchange up and running. Instead, they can reap the benefits – all they need to do is log into an administrator screen and run it from there. It can save considerable time and money, and give the smallest business the same kind of benefits that big companies do from Exchange.

Everywhere access to your mail
With Office 365, no matter where you are, your email is there as well. It includes Outlook in the cloud, so that you can use the Web-based version of Outlook to get your email from any computer. It also offers excellent support for Smartphone access to your email, including from the iPhone, Windows Phone 7 phones, and Android devices.

SharePoint for the rest of us
SharePoint lets you build web sites called Team Sites that allow everyone in your organization to collaborate on and share documents. As with Exchange, installing and maintaining SharePoint is beyond the capabilities of many small businesses.
In Office 365, you get SharePoint in the cloud, so you only need to focus on building the Team Sites, not worrying about the underlying hardware and software. Truth be told, SharePoint still isn’t for the weak of heart. But spend some time with it, and you can reap considerable benefits if you’ve got an organization that needs to share work.

By the way, this doesn’t mean that Office 365 doesn’t have problems – it does, notably how poorly integrated all of its parts are.

Best Regards,
Kristina Kozlova
Altabel Group
www.altabel.com

Want to be the most popular person on Facebook? According to a recent Facebook study of the way people write and react to status updates, all you have to do is write longer status updates, talk about music and sports. Also don’t be overly emotional, don’t talk about your family, don’t refer to time and use the word “you” a lot.

Facebook analyzed the word usage for about one million status updates from its US English speakers. The social network said all identifiable information was stripped from the status updates before they were analyzed, and Facebook team members did not read your status updates for the purposes of this study.

Once the updates were anonym zed, the words were organized into 68 different word categories based on the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count – a text analysis software program. Some examples of word categories used in the study include past tense verbs, prepositions, and religion and positive feelings.

Here’s a look at some of the study’s findings.

Angry Youth
Facebook youth are an angry, foul-mouthed, selfish bunch, according to the Facebook study. The company found that young people express more negative emotions than their elders, swear more and use personal pronouns such as “I” and “Me” more often.
Older Facebook folk, meanwhile, write longer prose in their updates, talk about others more often and pepper their language with more prepositions (to, in, at) and articles (a, the, some).

Morning People
Turns out, most folks on Facebook are morning people. The study found that status updates expressing positive emotions were highest in the morning, and became increasingly negative as the day wore on. So Facebook users – at least the U.S. English speakers – start the day in a good mood, but as the day goes on and the coffee wears off we become increasingly demoralized. How clichéd can you get?

The Blogger’s Secret
Facebook’s study also confirms something that bloggers and Fox News have known for years: negative comments produce more online activity. Sure, Facebook users might click the like button more often on updates expressing positive emotion. But Facebook found you can’t beat negativity for user engagement, as dismal status updates garnered more comments than positive ones. People are also less likely to comment on religious status updates, and rarely comment or like status update referring to sleep.

You’re welcome with your Facebook’s secrets!

Best Regards,
Kristina Kozlova
Altabel Group
www.altabel.com


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