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Archive for the ‘Big Data’ Category

The stumbling block for many companies and the reason why organizations fall behind in the planning and pre-planning stages of big data, appears to be confusion on how best to make big data work for the company and pay off competitively.

With all the talk about rapid deployment and breakneck business change, there can be a tendency to assume that businesses are up and running with new technologies as soon as these technologies emerge from proof of concept and enter a mature and commercialized state. However, the realities of where companies are don’t always reflect this.

Take virtualization. It has been on the scene for over a decade-yet recent research by 451 Research shows that only 51 percent of servers in enterprise data centers around the world are virtualized. Other recent survey data collected by DataCore shows that 80 percent of companies are not using cloud storage, although cloud concepts have also been with us for a number of years.

This situation is no different for big data, as reflected in a Big Data Work Study conducted by IBM’s Institute of Business Value. The study revealed that while 33 percent of large enterprises and 28 percent of mid-sized businesses have big data pilot projects under way, 49 percent of large enterprises and 48 percent of mid-sized businesses are still in big data planning stages, and another 18 percent of large enterprises and 38 percent of mid-sized businesses haven’t yet started big data initiatives.

The good news is that the study also showed that of those organizations actively using big data analytics in their businesses, 63 percent said that the use of information and analytics, including big data, is creating a competitive advantage for their organization–up from 37 percent just two years earlier.

The stumbling block for many and the reason why organizations fall behind in the planning and pre-planning stages of big data, appears to be confusion on how best to make big data work for the company and pay off competitively.

Big data projects need to demonstrate value quickly and be tightly linked to bottom line concerns of the business if big data is to cement itself as a long-term business strategy.

In far too many cases when people plan to build out a complete system and architecture before using a single insight or building even one predictive model to accelerate revenue growth. Everyone anticipates the day when Big Data can become a factory spitting out models that finally divulge all manner of secrets, insights, and profits.

So how do you jump start your big data efforts?

Find big data champions in the end business and business cases that are tightly constructed and offer opportunities where analytics can be quickly put to use.

When Yarra Trams of Melbourne Australia wanted to reduce the amount of repair time in the field for train tracks, it placed Internet sensors over physical track and polled signals from these devices into an analytics program that could assess which areas of track had the most wear, and likely would be in need of repair soon. The program reduced mean time to repair (MTTR) for service crews because it was able to preempt problems from occurring in the first place. Worn track could now be repaired or replaced before it ever became a problem-resulting in better service (and higher satisfaction) for consumers.

Define big data use cases that can either build revenue or contribute to the bottom line.

Santam, the largest short-term insurance provider in South Africa, used big data and advanced analytics to collect data about incoming claims, automatically assessing each one against different factors to help identify patterns of fraud to save millions in fraudulent insurance payments.

Focus on customers

There already is a body of mature big data applications that surround the online customer experience. Companies (especially if they are in retail) can take advantage of this if they team with a strong systems integrator or a big data products purveyor with experience in this area.

Walmart and Amazon analyze customer buying and Web browsing patterns for help in predicting sales volumes, managing inventory and determining pricing.

Kristina Kozlova

Kristina Kozlova
Kristina.Kozlova@altabel.com
Skype ID: kristinakozlova 
Marketing Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

WHAT

In today’s business and technology world you can’t have a conversation without touching upon the issue of big data. Some would say big data is a buzzword and the topic is not new at all. Still from my point of view recently, for the last two-three years, the reality around the data has been changing considerably and so it makes sense to discuss big data so hotly. And the figures prove it.

IBM reports we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every day. In 2011 our global output of data was estimated at 1.8 billion terabytes. What impresses it that 90 percent of the data in the world today was created in the past two years according to Big Blue. In the information century those who own the data and can analyze it properly and then use it for decision-making purpose will definitely rule the world. But if you don’t have the tools to manage and perform analytics on that never-ending flood of data, it’s essentially garbage.

Big data is not really a new technology, but a term used for a handful of technologies: analytics, in-memory databases, NoSQL databases, Hadoop. They are sometimes used together, sometimes not. While some of these technologies have been around for a decade or more, a lot of pieces are coming together to make big data the hot thing.

Big data is so hot and is changing things for the following reasons:
– It can handle massive amounts of all sorts of information, from structured, machine-friendly information in rows and columns toward the more human-friendly, unstructured data from sensors, transaction records, images, audios and videos, social media posts, logs, wikis, e-mails and documents,
– It works fast, almost instantly,
– It is affordable because it uses ordinary low-cost hardware.

WHY NOW

Big data is possible now because other technologies are fueling it:
-Cloud provides affordable access to a massive amount of computing power and to loads of storage: you don’t have to buy a mainframe and a data center, and pay just for what you use.
-Social media allows everyone to create and consume a lot of interesting data.
-Smartphones with GPS offer lots of new insights into what people are doing and where.
-Broadband wireless networks mean people can stay connected almost everywhere and all the time.

HOW

The majority of organizations today are making the transition to a data-driven culture that leverages data and analytics to increase revenue and improve efficiency. For this a complex approach should be taken, so called MORE approach as Avanade recommends:
-Merge: to squeeze the value out of your data, you need to merge data from multiple sources, like structured data from your CRM and unstructured data from social news feeds to gain a more holistic view on the point. The challenge here is in understanding which data to bring together to provide the actionable intelligence.
-Optimize: not all data is good data, and if you start with bad data, with data-driven approach you’ll just be making bad decisions faster. You should identify, select and capture the optimal data set to make the decisions. This involves framing the right questions and utilizing the right tools and processes.
-Respond: just having data does mean acting on it. You need to have the proper reporting tools in place to surface the right information to the people who need it, and those people then need the processes and tools to take action on their insights.
-Empower: data can’t be locked in silos, and you need to train your staff to recognize and act on big data insights.

And what is big data for your company? Why do you use it? And how do you approach a data-driven decision-making model in your organization?

Would be interesting to hear your point.

Helen Boyarchuk

Helen Boyarchuk
Helen.Boyarchuk@altabel.com
Skype ID: helen_boyarchuk
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development


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