Altabel Group's Blog

Posts Tagged ‘laptops

The Web as we know it have been born and matured on computers, but as it turns out now, computers no longer have dominance in it. According to a recent report by analyst Mary Meeker, mobile devices running iOS and Android now account for 45 percent of browsing, compared to just 35 percent for Windows machines. Moreover, Android and iOS have essentially achieved their share in just five years and their share is getting tremendously larger.

According to some forecasts their worldwide number of mobile devices users should overtake the worldwide number of PC users next year. If forecasts come true, this shift will not only continue, but accelerate. Based on data from Morgan Stanley, Meeker estimates roughly 2.9 billion people around the world will be using smartphones and tablets by 2015.

What does it mean now that more people are accessing the Web through tablets and smartphones rather than laptops and desktops? And is it really a big deal? Anyway, Internet is intended to be accessed from anywhere and thus from any device. Well, it is quite a change at least in terms most people consider the Web and how it gradually adapts to be used on mobile devices.

Apps-like sites
As mobile devices take over, the use of today’s desktop browsers like Internet Explorer, Chrome, Firefox, and Safari will decline. Mobile browsers are already very capable and will increasingly adopt HTML5 and leading-edge Web technologies. As mobile devices naturally have less screen area, the sites need to function more like mobile apps and less like collections of links. So the sites are likely to look like apps.

Apps may rule
Native apps for smartphones and tablets almost always surpass websites designed for mobile devices because they can tap into devices’ native capabilities for a more responsive and seamless experience. This is most likely to change in the nearest future – most experts agree HTML5 is eventually the way of the future. This is already the status quo in social gaming: for example Angry Birds and Words with Friends. Some services won’t be available at all to traditional PCs — they won’t be worth developers’ time.

Less information at once
Web sites and publishers will no longer be able to display everything new for users and hoping something will catch the user’s eye. Smaller screens and lower information density means sites will need to adjust to user preferences and profiles to customize the information they present. Increasingly, the Internet will become unusable unless sites believe they know who you are. Some services will handle these tasks themselves, but the most likely contenders for supplying digital identity credentials are Facebook, Google, Amazon, Apple, Twitter, and mobile carriers.

Sharing by default
In a mobile-focused Internet, anonymity becomes rare. Virtually every mobile device can be definitively associated with a single person (or small group of people). Defaults to share information and experiences with social circles and followers will be increasingly common, along with increasing reliance on disclosure of personal information (like location, status, and activities, and social connections) to drive key functionality. As the Internet re-orients around mobile, opting out of sharing will increasingly mean opting out of the Internet.

Emphasis on destination
Internet-based sites and services will increasingly function as a combination of content and functionality reluctant to link out to other sites or drive traffic (and potential advertising revenue) elsewhere. These have long been factors in many sites’ designs but mobile devices amplify these considerations by making traditional Web navigation awkward and difficult. Still URLs are not going to die – people will still send links to their friends and Web search will remain most users primary means of finding information online.

Going light weight
As people rely on mobile, cloud, and broadband services, the necessity to do things like commute, store large volumes of records or media, or patronize physical businesses will decline. Businesses won’t need to save years of invoices, statements, and paperwork in file boxes and storage facilities – cloud storage comes as their rescue. Banks will become purely virtual institutions consumers deal with online via their phones. Distance learning and collaborative tools will let students take their coursework with them anywhere — and eliminate the need to worry about reselling enormous textbooks.

Going mobile is an obvious trend today. Experts envisage that nearly every service, business, and person who wants to use the Internet will be thinking mobile first and PC second, if they think about PCs at all. Do you agree? And what other related changes can you imagine?

Many thanks for sharing your thoughts :)

Aliona Kavalevich

Aliona Kavalevich
Aliona.Kavalevich@altabel.com
Skype ID: aliona_kavalevich
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

We all have heard that Windows 8 will have more tablet and touch-like features and that it will erase the interminable boot up time that it currently takes a PC to start up. Windows 8 will be available for desktops, laptops, and tablets.
However W8 is not such a good thing as it seems to be from the first sight. And to prove it I`d like to give five reasons why people might want to stay away from W8:

Metro is designed for tablets

Microsoft heaped all of its creativity in Windows 8 on the new Metro interface.There are a lot of nice things there, but it’s been designed for tablets, not PCs. Not everyone will like working in an operating system designed for touchscreens having only a mouse and keyboard.

There’s nothing much new on the Desktop

Windows 8 relegates the Desktop to being just another app in Metro. When you get into the Desktop, it looks and works just like Windows 7 – and in some ways it is even worse. When you click the Start button, it doesn’t open a menu from which you can run apps, open documents, and so on. And if you want to use the Desktop Control Panel, you’ll have to switch back to Metro, move your mouse pointer to the lower left portion of the screen, select Settings, scroll to the bottom of the screen, and then select More Settings. In Windows 7, the Control Panel is available right on the Start menu. For those who live in the Desktop, Windows 8 doesn’t seem to offer any benefits over Windows 7, and may even be harder to use.

The interface is confusing

Windows 8 is essentially two operating systems, not one, mixed up together in a not-very smooth way. Metro is designed for tablets; the traditional Desktop is for PCs and laptops. There’s very little connection between the two; the interfaces look different from one another and work differently from one another. If you like a seamless, integrated operating system Windows 8 might not be for you.

Microsoft will control what Metro apps you can download

If you want to download a Metro app to run in Windows 8, you’ll only be able to do it via the Windows Store, just like Apple does with the App Store This breaks with the long-lasting Windows tradition of allowing people to download any app they want. In essence, this is a form of censorship. You’ll be able to download any app you want to the Desktop, but you can already do that in Windows 7, so why bother to move to Windows 8?

It’s trouble for businesses

Businesses will face serious problems upgrading Windows 7 to Windows 8 because of Metro – users will need time to get used to W8 or even to take some retraining cources, countless help calls to the Help Desk to aid with Metro problems, and deployment woes. Given that Metro is designed for consumers, not businesses, it’s not clear what benefit businesses will get out of Windows 8. They’ll likely stay away. :)

Thank you for your attention and you are welcome with your comments!

Kind regards,
Elvira Golyak (elvira.golyak@altabel.com)
Altabel Group – professional software development


%d bloggers like this: