Altabel Group's Blog

Posts Tagged ‘PC

We all have heard that Windows 8 will have more tablet and touch-like features and that it will erase the interminable boot up time that it currently takes a PC to start up. Windows 8 will be available for desktops, laptops, and tablets.
However W8 is not such a good thing as it seems to be from the first sight. And to prove it I`d like to give five reasons why people might want to stay away from W8:

Metro is designed for tablets

Microsoft heaped all of its creativity in Windows 8 on the new Metro interface.There are a lot of nice things there, but it’s been designed for tablets, not PCs. Not everyone will like working in an operating system designed for touchscreens having only a mouse and keyboard.

There’s nothing much new on the Desktop

Windows 8 relegates the Desktop to being just another app in Metro. When you get into the Desktop, it looks and works just like Windows 7 – and in some ways it is even worse. When you click the Start button, it doesn’t open a menu from which you can run apps, open documents, and so on. And if you want to use the Desktop Control Panel, you’ll have to switch back to Metro, move your mouse pointer to the lower left portion of the screen, select Settings, scroll to the bottom of the screen, and then select More Settings. In Windows 7, the Control Panel is available right on the Start menu. For those who live in the Desktop, Windows 8 doesn’t seem to offer any benefits over Windows 7, and may even be harder to use.

The interface is confusing

Windows 8 is essentially two operating systems, not one, mixed up together in a not-very smooth way. Metro is designed for tablets; the traditional Desktop is for PCs and laptops. There’s very little connection between the two; the interfaces look different from one another and work differently from one another. If you like a seamless, integrated operating system Windows 8 might not be for you.

Microsoft will control what Metro apps you can download

If you want to download a Metro app to run in Windows 8, you’ll only be able to do it via the Windows Store, just like Apple does with the App Store This breaks with the long-lasting Windows tradition of allowing people to download any app they want. In essence, this is a form of censorship. You’ll be able to download any app you want to the Desktop, but you can already do that in Windows 7, so why bother to move to Windows 8?

It’s trouble for businesses

Businesses will face serious problems upgrading Windows 7 to Windows 8 because of Metro – users will need time to get used to W8 or even to take some retraining cources, countless help calls to the Help Desk to aid with Metro problems, and deployment woes. Given that Metro is designed for consumers, not businesses, it’s not clear what benefit businesses will get out of Windows 8. They’ll likely stay away. :)

Thank you for your attention and you are welcome with your comments!

Kind regards,
Elvira Golyak (elvira.golyak@altabel.com)
Altabel Group – professional software development

Smart phones are already changing many markets in the IT industry. Mobile gaming represents one of the fastest growing segments of the digital games market, and potential for future growth remains strong as more consumers are using smartphones for games of all types, including the increasingly popular mobile game apps. Is the mobile gaming industry a threat to the console industry?

Traditional PC, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 games can take two to three years and $20 million to $30 million to build. By contrast, apps for Apple and Android handsets can be assembled in weeks for less than $20,000, which explains why they’ve captured an entire generation of bedroom entrepreneurs’ imaginations. Given sales of 100 million-plus iOS devices (iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, etc.) though, producing high-quality titles capable of selling in the millions isn’t the issue.

Despite the best efforts of Nintendo and Sony, mobile games are taking a bigger chunk out of the portable gaming market, with one in every three dollars of portable gaming revenue going to smartphone and tablet games, according to new analysis from mobile analytics firm Flurry. Games for mobile devices now account for almost half of all the game downloads.

Even most of the gamers who use a dedicated console to play online are spending the largest chunk of their change on games for mobile devices. The rest of their game funds are going toward titles downloaded for PCs, full consoles, portable consoles, and other systems.

A recent report revealed some startling facts about mobile gaming and the rise of smart phone gamers. iPhone user spends around 15 hours on average every month playing games. Android users weren’t far behind by cloaking 9.3 hours monthly average while other smart phone users were at 7.8 hours. Overall around 64% of people who download applications have installed a game in the past 30 day period making gaming apps the most popular genre of apps.

Although the message is clear many publishers are not very worried considering that the market is still dominated by console games. Since the cost of production for many mobile and social games is extremely low in comparison with console games, when the time comes for jumping ships or expanding over to mobile and social platforms it will not be difficult, especially for a video game development company that already has the assets, technology and manpower necessary to develop games for consoles and the PC market.

While portable gaming market is changing rapidly, Nintendo and Sony aren’t sitting still. Nintendo recently launched the 3DS, which sold almost 400,000 units in its first week, a respectable number that still fell short of some analyst expectations. Sony is working on new portable hardware and moving closer to the mobile market with plans to make its PlayStation software available on Android devices. We’ll have to see how the two gaming giants fare in their efforts to kick-start their businesses, but it’s clear mobile games are posing a huge challenge with their cheap (or free) pricing and easy digital distribution.

The rise of cheap mobile games, even as low as 99 cent apps are compared to that of the iTunes music revolution and that of the takeover of the traditional books market by self-publishers via eBooks. Does this mean that internet is about to change the gaming industry once again? Many companies have already started integrating their games into social and mobile platforms. EA and other major studios and platforms such as Sony, Microsoft, etc., have also started experimenting with social media platforms, as well as the development of games for mobile devices. However, for the near future, gaming companies are quite unlikely to have any serious issues due to the rising popularity of mobile games. There will always be a demand for console and PC games, in addition to mobile games.

And what do you personally think about expanding of mobile games popularity? Do you think mobile games are going to beat console games? And are they more advantageous to invest in?

Kind regards,
Aliona Kavalevich
Altabel Group – professional software development

The mobile gaming industry is booming; last year alone it made an estimated $800 million. People are buying games and applications on every available device including iOS devices, Smartphones, tablet PCs and more. It’s come to the point where the mobile gaming industry is actually pulling players and revenue from the traditional gaming market.

The mobile gaming community doesn’t just consist of a younger audience; it’s actually quite widespread across all ages. It’s obvious that social gaming directly correlates to the mobile gaming industry and isn’t just something a lot of kids and teenagers are into; everyone is!
Because mobile devices are so easily accessible and are always available, they make one of the best gaming devices period. This can most likely be attributed to why everyone is into mobile gaming.

Most developers are actually so successful because of the low cost pattern of designing mobile apps and games. Because it doesn’t cost much (when compared to traditional development) smaller independent companies are achieving what usually takes large teams of a dozen developers to accomplish. Mobile apps and games can be sold at a low cost to consumers because they are so inexpensive to develop thus ultimately increasing sales.

Developers also offer completely free games and apps through the use of in app advertising. Free or not, they still make money from the advertising strategically placed within their game or application. This marketing strategy also works because even though the application or game is free, consumers are forced to view advertisements in order to play. They deal with the advertisements because they love the game, and thus are subjected to potential marketing techniques which may or may not result in a purchase.

It won’t be long before mobile devices are sporting next gen technology in a pocket sized package. It most certainly wouldn’t be out of the question to predict that the mobile gaming industry will eventually kill the console gaming industry by offering cheaper options and more accessible technology in the future!

If you are not developing mobile applications and mobile games you are missing out on a substantial revenue gain; especially if you’re a game developer or work in the gaming industry.
It’s time to take mobile gaming seriously. As more and more mobile devices hit the consumer market mobile gaming use will increase not just across the country, but around the globe. Add in the fact that mobile device technology is advancing faster than any other computer based technology out there, and you’ve got a surefire winner on your hands.

What are your thoughts on the rise of the mobile gaming industry? Do you feel that the mobile game market is a great business venture? Do you or your business have experience in the mobile gaming market or related industries? Please join the discussion and let us know your thoughts.

BR,
Kristina
Altabel Group – professional software development

IBM engineer Mark Dean, who helped design the first personal computer, recently proclaimed that the PC was dead. Also of note: Google some weeks ago bought Motorola Mobility, not a PC maker. Are you ready to trade in your desktop or laptop for a tablet or Smartphone?

Some interesting thoughts from LI members bellow:

«I do not think the PC will be dead any time soon. You cannot compare a tablet or even a Smartphone to what you can do with a PC or Laptop. At least not until both are as powerful as a PC or laptop, and have peripheral ports for external monitors and input devices.
I have used a laptop as my main computer for about 7 years, but last year decided to move back to a PC setup. It was faster, and less noisy. I am glad I made that choice.
Some people and companies envision that the PC will give way to a ‘thin client’ that will hook up to the internet and access everything from there as SaaS applications. I doubt that will happen any time soon either. I do not think I’m the only one if I say that I like to be in absolute control over my PC and what is on it. I decide if I want to go online, and do not want to be forced to go online because of SaaS software that requires it. And I do not want to store anything in the cloud either, because there is no one I trust more with the data I own, than myself.»
Jeroen Wierda

« I use both a MacBook (a great PC) for desk use & long work sessions and an iPad for on the road presentations, checking email and reading eBooks. I use just a simple flip-phone for voice calls since the iPad is so much better (internet and emails) due to the large screen.
Both are types of PCs and I don’t see them disappearing any time soon. We will see new forms (smaller) and applications but personal computers will be around for a long time in one shape or another…»
Bryan C Webb
President/CEO

«The future is convergence, where one mobile device, perhaps with docking to support peripherals, is all we need. Motorla’s Atrix is a step in that direction. Before long time most of us won’t need peripherals. Cloud technologies, which eliminate the need for disk drives, are another step. Do we really need printers? If it’s stored electronically why do you need to print it? Scanners? Cameras are getting to the point where they can do that. Mouse? More accurate than finger on a tiny screen, but that will improve. Keyboard? I used to type 90 wpm, and that was on a manual typewriter with no correction capability. I’m not about to give that up. But voice recognition, etc. will soon kill the archaic QWERTY keyboard. Thumb pads on Smartphones have already eliminated it for many people. Bottom line, the PC is on the way out. But it isn’t dead yet.»
Don Strayer
Owner, Don Strayer Consulting LLC

«Absolutely not, the PC, Tablets and Smartphones have different markets and applications. But of course, what it is happening is that many people is discovering that with Tablet or Smartphone, they don’t need any netbook, laptop or PC only for surfing, sharing pictures with friends and playing some casual games in their spare time.
If I should bet for something, I would bet for a Smartphone/Tablet for mobility (depends of how big you want/need your screen), and probably a Laptop (PC/MAC) as main computer, with an external wireless Monitor/Keyboard/Mouse at office/home»
Ivan Salinas
Engineer and Musician

«Depends on the user. Yes I can access a lot of info from my Smartphone but there are a lot of technical applications that need a PC with a large screen. Ever try to use AutoCad to design a mechanical part using a phone or tablet PC? What about an electrical schematic or floor plan? How about writing large documents/manuals/etc without a full-size keyboard?
Sales to the average consumer/homeowner may have reached saturation but business and industry still require the workhorse PC.»
Tat Chiu

And what do think? Has the PC outlived its usefulness?

BR,
Kristina
Altabel Group – professional software development

CES 2011 has delivered the goods on tablets, mobile phones, next-gen PCs and much more. What’s the highest-impact news from the show?

Callum Finlayson, Management consultant at AP Benson says:
«There was nothing that really stood out significantly in my opinion. Nothing radical, nothing’s changed, no breakthroughs, no amazing innovation. The most high impact things were probably the Motoroal Atrix (as everyone and their dog is saying) and the confirmation that everyone in the industry is now committed to tablets, but nobody’s quite got it right yet.»

Madrixo Levorne, Graphic Design Professional and Program/Game Developer:
«I think that it’s some advanced developed hologram device able to reproduce realistic fully animated projections.»

Ivan Law, Team Lead – 365 Initiative at Canadian Undergraduate Technology Conference counts:
«Some would say the release of Android 3.0, or Honeycomb for tablet devices or the proliferation of dual core Android cell phones such as the Motorola Atrix or the LG Optimus 2X. However, I think the highest impact news was that Ford launched the new electric Focus at CES2011, marking this the first CES ever where a car company decided to launch a major new product.»

Balaji Lakshmanan, CTO at Vast Communications:
«I think the blackberry tablet (playbook), LG pen touch multi board and Sony 3d TV stood out.»

You’re welcome with your comments!

Best Regards,
Kristina Kozlova
Altabel Group
www.altabel.com


%d bloggers like this: