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Posts Tagged ‘Security

Every business starts from the question: ”Which direction to take, how to choose the right niche…”. Most start-ups choose software development as the direction to start with because of quite low launching costs, easiness to start the business, high popularity of IT and the well-known postulate “software will eat the world”. But when choosing IT sphere it is quite important to understand this market and find new perspective areas in it. As investors and business angels are much more eager to invest not in what is popular today, but what will be the future of tomorrow.

In my article I would like to draw your attention to some trends that seem promising in my opinion

The Internet of things

The Internet of Things is likely to have a staggering impact on our daily life and become an inherent part of such areas as electricity, transportation, industrial control, retail, utilities management, healthcare, petroleum etc. For example, GE predicts that the oil and gas industry will be able to save more than $90 billion a year thanks to the reduced operating costs and fuel consumption that smart components will deliver. The health care sector may save more than $63 billion because of improved resource usage and modern equipment.

Also the Industrial Internet will make transport more economical, and safer too. Jumbo jets, loaded with sensors that record every detail of their flights, will help engineers to design safer aero-planes and know which parts need to be replaced. On the road, fleets of trucks and even ordinary drivers will be able to tap into the web, monitoring traffic in real time, with automated programs suggesting alternative routes in case of accidents/traffic congestion.

Of course, all of these benefits mean plenty of business opportunities for those who are brave enough to make the first step. Profits will grow exponentially as the Internet of Things itself matures. Today, there’s around 1.3 billion connected devices in the world, but by 2020 this could well exceed 12.5 billion devices. Similarly, the M2M (machine-2-machine) industry is said to be worth around $121 billion a year today. By 2020, that value will grow to almost $950 billion, according to the Carbon War Room. Don’t lose your chance!

Computer Science health

This sphere suit startups that plan to develop software to diagnose and treat diseases (i’m not taking about Biotech, but about Information Technology). As a rule it is a noninvasive methodology. The technology will help to avoid costly and dangerous procedures: instead of an operation it will be enough to use  a specialized device Different kinds of fitness applications have already filled the market. Apps that evaluate sleep state and help to wake up at the most opportune moment, that evaluate quality, caloric value and allergenicity of food are not a rarity anymore. More and more people keep track of their daily activity: number of steps made, calories burned, heart rate etc by using bracelets and kardiosensors. But the real revolution will produce a system that will combine sensor data and sensor condition of the body with genetic information. The Apps will give an opportunity to influence the physical state, recommending an appropriate lifestyle and a specific diet, supplements and medicines.

Security

In 2012 and 2013 we saw significant data breaches across multiple industries and governments impacting millions of users. For instance, according to a recent study conducted by Ponemon Institute, nearly 1.5 million Americans have been victims of medical identity theft. Individuals whose medical information has been stolen often deal with erroneous medical expenses, insurance issues and incorrect data on medical records that can lead to fatal medical errors. And data security issues compromise more than patient privacy and personal data.

Is this an uncertain future we will have to live with? Can we accept degraded privacy and security and billions of dollars in lost revenue, damage, reduction in brand value and remediation costs?

Such issues will become the concern of more and more enterprise leaders. Thus, Data Security could be the biggest challenge for startups.

“Green Energy” field

We live in the world of limited subsoil resources. We may experience and in fact we do already experience their shortage. The time of “users” is close to the end and the era of “creators” is coming instead. The “creators” are sure, that the potential of the “Green Energy” is huge… and they are right. Every fifth kWh is got from renewable energy sources in the developed countries. Let’s see what is happening in the world:

Elon Musk, the creator of PayPal, has opened a company that produces electric cars Tesla. For three years they have produced quite expansive super-cars and rectified technologies …btw the technologies are still being improved ( hope you understand what I’m driving at…). Also the super-cars require refueling …with the help of solar batteries, which are quite widespread in the USA and Western Europe. By the way it is predicted that America, South Canada and most of Europe will be covered with solar stations by the end of 2015 year (another niche ;) ) and the solar batteries will be used not only for the refueling).

What I’m driving at …want to say that there will be need in different applications (including mobile apps as well) for its ordering, managing etc.

In conclusion I would like to wish you to find your niche and not be afraid of  putting your ideas out and trying them. Good luck and thanks for the reading :)

Elvira Golyak Elvira Golyak
Elvira.Golyak@altabel.com
Skype ID: elviragolyak
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

When you say “cloud” somebody’s imagination draws a sky with dozens of funny-shaped airy clouds, IT folks’ mind will recall companies’ names like Microsoft, Google, Dropbox, Amazon. Indeed, cloud computing has contributed to the business world tremendously, still there is much skepticism around such kind of services, reliability and security of remote clouds. Naturally when you store all your data in the cloud you “shift” control over it and rely on a cloud provider – here your fears of data possibly to be lost, damaged, leaked or hacked, services and sites to be kicked offline, come on to the stage. Legally according to the agreement between you and provider the service provider would be responsible should any of the aforementioned occur, but at the end of the day the possible losses endured by the business resorting to the cloud are greater than the cloud service provider’s since such actions could result in the complete destruction of the business. So a decision of moving to the cloud is a serious one.

Interesting that more than a third (36%) named security a main issue holding back uptake for them. This concern is contradictory due to a number of factors:
Firstly, the whole point of cloud computing is that the applications and data being used are sitting on multiple servers at once in data centers located around the world. Thus attacking one part of the infrastructure becomes virtually a waste of time as redundancy will always ensure access to this data. It means attacking data or performance of a targeted company becomes almost “mission impossible”.
Secondly, it makes sense to view security matter from the perspective of the capabilities of the cloud computing systems versus ones of internal software systems. How high are chances that a large cloud provider won’t have far more resources to direct at security than the average enterprise? The infrastructure of cloud computing systems is comprised of machinery and technology on the cutting edge of technological advancements in addition to the far-advanced skills and knowledge of their workers – doubtful that this is accessible to an average business or computer user. Therefore, the business has a greater chance of loss handling the company data and software internally. As more and more organizations make the move into the cloud, it’s certain that safety and security measures only increase.

Experts say a more reasonable concern relates to resilience and outages, not data breach. Outages of Amazon or Microsoft are regularly reported. They can be caused by freak weather like for instance happened to Amazon Web Services resulting in such popular services as Instagram and Netflix being pushed offline for a number of hours. Instagram’s outage hit the headlines due to a short period of downtime, but what if smaller companies using cloud providers face their sites knocked offline – how high up their cloud provider’s list of priorities will it be to get it fixed? Well, in this case for web sites it’s of vital importance to be hosted with multiple cloud providers since this makes sites virtually almost unassailable experiencing close to zero downtime.

Worries about legal compliance are probably more justifiable. Under the Data Protection Act, organisations have to agree that personal data will not be moved outside a particular group of named European countries, but a cloud provider may be storing data in multiple jurisdictions. This problem isn’t insurmountable (personal data can be anonymised, for example), but it does make the decision to move to the cloud a more complex one.

To conclude, cloud computing service providers treat security, availability, privacy and legal compliance issues very seriously since this is the essence of their very business. СSPs mostly have better machinery, technology and skills and invest more in their further advancement than an average enterprise could afford itself. Loss or damage of any data by a cloud services provider or long downtime does not only implicate a possible demise or huge direct and indirect losses of the business to which the service was provided, but can be partially or completely fatal for the cloud computing service business and its reputation. Cloud services providers are legally implied with massive liability which is very incentive for them to preserve a high quality of their services and treat issues with due diligence.
Or don’t you agree? :)

Kind regards,
Helen Boyarchuk – Business Development Manager (LI page)
Helen.Boyarchuk@altabel.com | Skype ID: helen_boyarchuk
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

More than 600,000 Macs have been infected with a new version of the Flashback Trojan horse that’s being installed on people’s computers with the help of Java exploits. How does this infection affect Apple’s reputation for security? Let’s see what LI members think on this point:

“Not in the slightest. Most of Apple’s users wouldn’t know what Flashback is, nor would they care. Did Lulzsec’s hack of Sony’s PSN have any effect on Sony users? Not a bit.
If there will be any change it may be from Sysadmins realizing that there’s no such thing as a perfectly secure OS. Good education on how to use systems applies equally to Mac and Windows users – always has. The OS may be slightly better, but there are still multiple different apps and other attack vectors that can be used – following bad links probably the top of that list.”
Yousef Syed
Technical Project Manager & Info Sec Architect

“I think it is funny. Most people still think that only Microsoft software gets viruses.”
Keith Baldwin
Real Time Card Stunts for sports teams & sports events

“Mac OS X has a great reputation for security in general, but it’s not perfect. Most of the malware we see exploit vulnerabilities in other platforms installed on top of OS X like Java and Adobe Flash. The latest, LuckyCat even comes in through Microsoft Word 2011! Apple’s response may have been slow, but it was definitive. Apple has eliminated the threat with standard software updates. It’s just a question of time before the current variant of Flashback is extinct.
As for Apple’s reputation, it will be a bit tarnished by the outbreak because most people don’t understand the true mechanism of these attacks. That being said, Since Apple controls when Java gets updated for OS X, Apple would do well to keep Java updated on a more regular basis. They allowed this vulnerability to exist for Mac OS X even when the main Java codebase had already been patched.”
Jason Miller
Business Technology Consultant

“I would say that it shows that their OS isn’t inherently more secure, just less targeted, but that isn’t actually what was at play here.
The vulnerability wasn’t in OS X, but rather in the implementation of Java that came with it. Apple manages its own JRE deployment to OS X, and as a result this vulnerability came into play only on Apple’s environment. That vulnerability lends itself well to exploitation, and that’s what happened. Security…real security…was never about how tight an operating system or application is. I mean, that’s a part of it, but there isn’t anything that has no vulnerabilities. And so, the really important thing that determines security is the overarching process and capability to manage those vulnerabilities and deal with them. Microsoft used to entirely suck at this…but now they are the industry leader. Nobody issues patches like they do; theirs is the gold standard. And yes, some of their vulnerabilities go a long time without being fixed, but when I look at how much code comprises Windows these days, and the damage that results if they issue a bad patch, I don’t know that I really want to yell at Microsoft over it. And Apple does worse.”
Rob Shein
Power Generation Cyber Security Lead

“I don’t think it affects it at all. Apple has always had a poor reputation for security in terms of providing patches in a timely manner. In terms of overall reputation for security though, the machines have enjoyed a minor user-base for years and thus were not targeted often. Now that the user base has increased exponentially in recent years, one can only expect that the amount of exploits in production for the platform will also rise.
In terms of my own personal feelings on the matter. I still trust my Mac. I still use an industry standard antivirus solution (ClamXav). Most importantly, I don’t surf the types of sites that typically are used to host malware, and watch what I click on. I’ve been pretty happy and virus free for years so no complaints here.”
Kevin Creechan
at Aholattafun Creative Solutions

“It will probably have a small negative effect on the market perception of Apple security but perhaps the real question is will that have any impact on Apple’s business? My feeling is that Apple’s perceived security advantages do not lead to increased sales, but if they ignore the increasing threat to their platforms it could have a significant negative effect in the medium term.”
Robert Rowlingson
an Independent Consultant, Researcher and Author

Maybe you have something to add? You’re welcome with your comments.

Best Regards,
Kristina Kozlova
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

We are now living in the age of the Smartphone, and as Google has recently proved, there are millions of people getting new phones every single week (over 500,000 Android devices are activated every day!). As the number of users increases, so will the security risks that Smartphones bring to us.

Even though Android and the iPhone are pretty secure, they definitely can be broken and used to spy on people, steal data from the device and for other malicious purposes. The recent Carrier IQ scandal has shown that you don’t even need to know about an app on your phone or approve it for it to be running and transmitting every keystroke to a remote server.

With that in mind, below you may find LI members’ advices that help you keep your Smartphone safe and secure:

«Trusting any individual app for security is questionable. If you have a knowledgeable programmer pal (in mobile, network security) and the source code is available then you can tell with certainty that your Smartphone is secure with an app. You can use that in tandem with a trusted Smartphone antivirus, anti malware, anti root kit software. At least you need to use this if you don’t have source unencrypted code at disposal. If you download from market you may not have source code. Most market operators check for security violations. Despite that
some apps send identifiable customer data for marketing purpose.»
Vinodh Sen Ethirajulu
Technical Lead,ING Institutional Plan Services

«I use the mobile security product from the company that makes the phone and I also have my phone locked using a pattern.»
Tim Tymchyshyn
Senior Sales Representative

«I and all my techy friends, have standard phone securities such as passwords and pins, we have a home record of IMEI numbers and sim references.
As for Apps we all use Preyproject. They have a free version which can secure 3 devices, it can allow SMS or Online activation, which sends reports to your email every 10 minutes with GPS location and WIFI tracking, it can also secure you laptop, if it has a camera, will also email you a picture of the next person using it!! Genius!»
Daniel Rose
Systems Administrator at MWL Systems

«I do not own a Smartphone because there is no such thing as security with that particular device.»
Kenneth Larson
MicroMentor Volunteer and Founder “Smalltofeds”

«I always prefer to use security product or protection system provided by the mobile company itself as its always doubtful to trust the various security based mobile applications.»
Shivam Agarwal
Business Analyst at Algoworks

The security risks that a Smartphone brings with it will only grow in number in the following years, and if you have any sensitive data on your phone (especially if you’re using Google Wallet or some sort of credit card number storage app) or don’t want to fall victim to any scam, you should start getting acquainted with the various security apps and tools available for your handset right now.

Best Regards,
Kristina Kozlova
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development


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