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Internet of Things(IoT) is extremely broad phrase, and can mean a great many different things. But it does not change the fact that each day more and more devices all over the world are being connected to the Internet. At that rate, Internet of Things (IoT) development projects are gaining popularity to say the least.

It is definitely the trend. This brings up a question: what programming languages are the most popular for IoT project? Well, according to the Eclipse Foundation survey, Java, JavaScript, C, and Python are the top four programming choices for developers who are building IoT solutions. Let’s look into them!


Though some people question the use of Java in IoT it is not surprising to see Java as being the most popular among developers who are working on IoT solutions. The practicality of the statement “write once, run anywhere” still predetermines the choice in a great measure.

Java advantages are apparent. It is an object-oriented and platform independent language. Thus coding and debugging can be done on desktop and moved to any chip with a Java Virtual Machine afterwards. Therefore code can be run not only on places where JVMs are common (servers and smartphones), but also on the smallest machines. Minimum hardware dependency is a huge plus. This also means that Java is great from an economic standpoint: devotion to Java coding can pay back across various platforms.

Besides, by now Java has attracted an active community of millions software developers and is being taught as one of the primary programming languages in the majority of engineering degree programs. Consequently, finding someone skilled in Java programming should not constitute a problem.

Last but not the least, maturity and stability of this language make it even more attractive. When there are devices that are going to be remotely managed and provisioned for a long period of time, Java’s stability and care about backwards compatibility become important.

It should be taken into consideration thought that your choice of IoT platform should support Java. You should make sure available hardware support libraries should have control functions according to your requirements too.


Combining some knowledge from other languages JavaScript has not only proven itself worthy on both the client and server side of the web, but it also has a huge potential in the growing Internet of Things domain.

The main difference between Javascript and Java is that JavaScript is a scripting language that has a range of existing libraries, plugins, and APIs, and many of them can be used to create complicated IoT apps easier and faster. Instead of building a range of new libraries and plugins, developers are free to reuse and further develop existing solutions around the web for absolutely new implementations.

Remarkably, applications that listen for events and respond when events occur are a strength of a JavaScript. Effective and secure communications and interactivity are of paramount importance in the IoT, and there are great systems for dealing with requests and events. For example, maintains an open connection between the server and the browser and thus enables the server to push updates to the browser as they happen. This gives you a chance to see the changes in the IoT network without a page refresh. By providing real time event based communication across multiple devices really comes in handy.

Additionally, much of the Internet is built on JavaScript and huge portion of the web functionality is enabled through JavaScript. Connecting up the web to our IoT devices and using the language that web pages and web apps already speak lead to simplicity in management.

It’s important to mention however, that Javascript would be a bad choice for lightweight embedded controllers.


Created to program the telephone switches C programming language has almost monopolized embedded systems programming. Its proximity to machine language makes it impressively fast.

C can create compact and faster runtime code. Still it should be noted that runtime speed isn’t the primary aspect of development to consider. Development speed should also be takes into account (and other languages may be much more efficient in that).

Another vote for stems from the fact that majority of the modern languages follow the syntax of C, which means that it is easy to learn and effective in accomplishing advanced tasks.

As both completing complex tasks and finding developers with extensive experience in C is relatively easy, its applicability to IoT projects speaks for itself.

Still, there are some drawbacks of C that make it less preferred in today’s development world, e.g. poor data security and no run time checking mechanism.


Although Python originally is widely chosen for Web development, it has significantly gained popularity in the IoT coding arena for the past few years. Such huge advantages as its flexibility, writability, error reduction, and readability contributed to that greatly. Distribution of compact executable code is easy. Working in programming teams is easy. Known as organized and neat, its elegant syntax is great for database arrangement. Sure, Python is a good choice for building applications that take data, convert it into any sort of a database format and draw upon the tables for control information. Python also has libraries for all 3 main IoT protocols such as TCP/IP, Bluetooth and NFC.

Additionally, IoT projects involve lots of data analytics and Python has rich modules for that.

Finally, major IoT hardware platforms and micro-controllers, e.g. Arduino, Raspberry PI, Intel Galileo, are enabled for interactive communication through Python.

Probably, the main problem for Python is its runtime speed, especially in comparison to C. Still there is a number of ways to optimize the code so it runs more efficiently.

Steady increase in popularity of Python for IoT is evident.

So which programming language is the best for IoT?

No definite answer, guys… All the above languages influence the IoT space up to an extent. However, the preference of language today depends on the end use of the app, product or service you want to create. What do you think? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!



Alexandra Presniatsova

Business Development Manager

Skype: alex.presniatsova
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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


We see this “Is Java out of business?” question pop up year after year. They say that Java is the least feature-rich language of the popular languages on the JVM and the slowest to move on new features in the last decade. There are also people who believe that because so many new JVM languages are being invented is proof that the Java language is lacking and that Java is no longer meeting the needs of many developers. And yet, by all external markers, Java is alive, well, and growing.

Here are several proofs for it:

1. TIOBE ranked Java as its top language of 2015 currently shows it enjoying 5% growth in use since 2014, more than any other programming language.

2. RedMonk has recently published the latest edition of its bi-annual list of the top programming languages. Compiled with the help of data obtained from GitHub and StackOverflow, this list tells us about the usage and discussion of a language on the web. Just like the previous years Java is among the top of the programming languages.

3. Further, the PYPL Index, which ranks languages based on how often language tutorials are searched on Google, shows Java clearly out in front with 23.9% of the total search volume.

Since Java first appeared it has gained enormous popularity. Its rapid ascension and wide acceptance can be traced to its design and programming features, particularly in its promise that you can write a program once, and run it anywhere. Java was chosen as the programming language for network computers (NC) and has been perceived as a universal front end for the enterprise database. As stated in Java language white paper by Sun Microsystems: “Java is a simple, object-oriented, distributed, interpreted, robust, secure, architecture neutral, portable, multithreaded, and dynamic.”

So here are the most common and significant advantages of Java that helped it to take its high position in a quite competitive environment of programming languages:

  • Java is easy to learn.
    Java was designed to be easy to use and is therefore easy to write, compile, debug, and learn than other programming languages.
  • Java is platform-independent.
    One of the most significant advantages of Java is its ability to move easily from one computer system to another. The ability to run the same program on many different systems is crucial to World Wide Web software, and Java succeeds at this by being platform-independent at both the source and binary levels.
  • Java is secure.
    Java considers security as part of its design. The Java language, compiler, interpreter, and runtime environment were each developed with security in mind.
  • Java is robust.
    Robust means reliability. Java puts a lot of emphasis on early checking for possible errors, as Java compilers are able to detect many problems that would first show up during execution time in other languages.
  • Java is multithreaded.
    Multithreaded is the capability for a program to perform several tasks simultaneously within a program. In Java, multithreaded programming has been smoothly integrated into it, while in other languages, operating system-specific procedures have to be called in order to enable multithreading.

Nonetheless things changed since the time when Java was created. In the recent years, many important languages have appeared and left an impact on the technology world. Due to their simplicity and user-friendliness, they have managed to surpass the more established languages. So we tried to make a list of reasons why Java is going to stay on the grind in the nearest future:

1. Java is time-proved.
You generally need a strong reason to switch from a language you’re currently using: it requires time to practice and learn new languages, and you have to be confident that the language you’re considering switching to will be supported in the long term. Nobody wants to build software in a language that will be obsolete in five years’ time.

2. JVM and the Java Ecosystem.
The Java Virtual Machine, or JVM. compiles programs into bytecode, which is then interpreted and run by the JVM. Because the JVM sits above your specific hardware and OS, it allows Java to be run on anything, a Windows machine, a Mac, or an obscure some flavor of Linux.

The big advantage granted by the JVM is in this increased compatibility and the stability it affords. Because your application runs in the VM instead of directly on your hardware, you can program said application once and trust that it is executable on every device with a Java VM implementation. This principle is the basis for Java’s core messaging: “Write once, run everywhere.” And it makes Java applications very resilient to underlying changes in the environment.

3. Java and the Internet of Things.
“I really think Java’s future is in IoT. I’d like to see Oracle and partners focused on a complete end-to-end storage solution for Java, from devices through gateways to enterprise back-ends. Building that story and making a success of it will help cement the next 20 years for Java. Not only is that a massive opportunity for the industry, but also one I think Java can do quite well,” said Mike Milinkovich, Executive Director of the Eclipse Foundation.

Oracle agrees. Per VP of Development Georges Saab, “Java is an excellent tech for IoT. Many of the challenges in IoT are many of the challenges of desktop and client Java helped address in the 1990s. You have many different hardware environments out there. You want to have your developers look at any part of the system, understand it and move on. Java is one of the few technologies out there that lets you do that.”
Thus, Java might have its detractors, and some of their arguments might even be reasonable. Nonetheless Java has evolved a lot since its inception, holds the lead in many areas of software development and has more prospects for the future. So, in our opinion, its survivability is not in doubt.

And what do you think? Is Java going to become one of the dead languages? Or it has all chances to survive? Feel free to share your thoughts in comments below!



Yana Khaidukova

Business Development Manager

Skype: yana_altabel
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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


With the coming of Node.js, JavaScript has taken the lead. It is no longer limited to front-end development, and back-end development is no longer super complex for front-end coders. It became a popular and a well-known programming language used by developers in browsers.

Today, Node.js offers one of the most innovative solutions to building servers and web/mobile applications. Its single-threaded event looping and asynchronous, non-blocking input/output processing feature distinguishes it from other runtime environments. Its scope is increasing fast with valuable contributions from developers’ community and other technology giants. Right now, several performance-driven frameworks are being developed using primary principles and approaches of Node.js. These frameworks have extended the functionality of Node.js to a great extent and have also built newer features.

In this article let’s have a look at the frameworks associated with Node.js so that you can choose the one you like.


Express is a minimal and flexible Node.js web application framework that provides a robust set of features for web and mobile applications. With a myriad of HTTP utility methods and middleware at your disposal, creating a robust API is quick and easy. Express provides a thin layer of fundamental web application features, without obscuring Node.js features that you know and love. Many popular frameworks are based on Express.


Sails is the most popular MVC framework for Node.js. Sails makes it easy to build custom, enterprise-grade Node.js apps. It is designed to emulate the familiar MVC pattern of frameworks like Ruby on Rails, but with support for the requirements of modern apps: data-driven APIs with a scalable, service-oriented architecture. It’s especially good for building chat, real-time dashboards, or multiplayer games; but you can use it for any web application project – top to bottom.


Hapi.js is a powerful Node.js web framework for building APIs and other software applications. The framework has a robust plugin system and numerous key features, including input validation, configuration-based functionality, implement caching, error handling, logging and more. Hapi.js is used for designing useful applications, such as Postmile, a collaborative list making tool. Besides, it is used for providing technology solutions by several large-scale websites, such as Disney, Concrete, PayPal, Walmart and more.


Koa is a new web framework designed by the team behind Express, which aims to be a smaller, more expressive, and more robust foundation for web applications and APIs. Through leveraging generators Koa allows you to ditch callbacks and greatly increase error-handling. Koa does not bundle any middleware within core, and provides an elegant suite of methods that make writing servers fast and enjoyable.


Meteor.js is a real-time application designed to build Web apps that constantly synchronize with the server. Your changes to templates and data flow from the server to the browser automatically. The redrawing and the updating are handled directly by the underlying framework. This works, by the way, in both directions. Your browser code can make changes or write data as if the database is right there. The synchronization happens in the background.


Derby.js is a full-stack MVC framework built for establishing a more solid routine towards creating modern web applications without the need to write complicated code. With Derby you can easily build real-time applications that will run simultaneously in the Node.js server and the browser. The Racer Engine that Derby enables for developers to use is a powerful way of synchronizing your browser, server and database data in real-time amongst all three mediums, enabling you and your app users to experience a true real-time experience. Racer supports offline usage and conflict resolution out of the box, which greatly simplifies writing multi-user applications.


Total.js is one of the modern and modular Node.js frameworks supporting model-view controller (MVC) software architecture. It is fully compatible with various client-side frameworks, like Angular.js, Polymer, Backbone.js, Bootstrap and more. Total.js is fully extensible and asynchronous. One great feature of Total.js is that you don’t need any tools like Grunt to compress JavaScript, HTML and CSS. Additionally, the framework has NoSQL embedded database and supports array and other prototypes. It supports RESTful routing mechanism, supports web sockets, media streaming and more.


Not every application requires full support for a browser. Restify is one of the server-side frameworks designed to serve up data and only data through an API. You fire it up and out comes JSON to everyone who shows up.
Restify places special emphasis on debugging and profiling so that you can drill down and optimize the performance of your server. DTrace is well-integrated and supported to make it possible to watch what happens and when it might go wrong. Restify is available from GitHub under a very basic license that requires little except a notice of copyright.

Web and apps development landscape is changing very fast and developers are shifting to frameworks aiming at quick and clean project delivery. The biggest plus of using node frameworks is that they provide high level readymade structure and you can focus on scaling your application instead of spending efforts in building and defining the basics.

Let us know your experience with Node.js frameworks via comments. Perhaps there are any «new comers» that deserve our attention?


Yuliya Tolkach

Yuliya Tolkach

Business Development Manager

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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development



If you are a techie person, you, of course, know the tradition to write a little program to print the text “Hello, world!” to the screen when learning a new language. So today I would like to say “Hello, Rust!” to relatively new system programming language that runs blazingly fast, prevents segmentation faults, and guarantees thread safety.

Rust gives many of the same benefits as traditional systems languages while being highly reliable, more approachable, safer and often more productive.

Although Rust development is sponsored by Mozilla, it is an open community project that strives to be a warm, welcoming and inclusive network of people, who act together to build something awesome. Today, Rust has a worldwide audience with its users in Europe, Japan and Australia. And what is more, Rust jumped to the first place in Stack Overflow annual survey for being Most Loved Programming Language of 2016.

Now we’ll go a little bit deeper into Rust and find out why this programming language grows in popularity and stays focused on three main goals: safety, speed and concurrency.


Mozilla employee Graydon Hoare started developing Rust as a personal project in 2006. In 2009 Mozilla began sponsoring the project. In 2010 Rust was officially announced on Mozilla Summit 2010. After several years of active development the first stable version (Rust 1.0) was released on May 15, 2015. Thereafter the release of new version is available every six weeks.

Nowadays we see more companies dealing with Rust. Each one has its own reason to do this.

  • Mozilla. The company has developed Rust code to replace the C++ code that currently handles complex media formats.
  • Dropbox. While much of Dropbox’s back-end infrastructure is historically written in Go, some key components were rewrote in Rust.

Aside from above mentioned tech giants, the other companies that use Rust in production are Skylight, Terminal and MaidSafe.


Let’s review how Rust can solve the problems and what type of solutions best flow from it.

  • The goal of Rust is to be a safe language that means ‘doesn’t do anything unsafe’.
  • Rust lets us control the costs and guarantees of a program. Rust is a compiled language. Its compiler adheres to strict safety rules, thanks to which additional costs for code execution are missed. As a result of that it’s needed minimum time for implementation or in some cases this time isn’t required at all. So Rust can be used in a real time mode or as an add-in project.
  • There are only two kinds of statements in Rust: ‘declaration statements’ and ‘expression statements’ and everything else is an expression. So Rust is primarily an expression-based language.
  • It is also important to have a well-defined interface, so that some of your functionality is private, and some is public. To facilitate these kinds of things, Rust has a module system.
  • Like most programming languages, Rust encourages the programmer to handle errors in a particular way. That’s why return values are responsible for error handling here.
  • If you know C, C++ or even Java, you will become familiar with the language without any problems.
  • The Rust project uses a concept called ‘release channels’ to manage releases. It’s important to understand this process to choose which version of Rust (Nightly, Beta or Stable) your project should use. New ‘Nightly’ releases are created once a day. Every six weeks, the latest ‘Nightly’ release is promoted to ‘Beta’. Six weeks later, the ‘Beta’ is promoted to ‘Stable’, and becomes the next release of 1.x. Generally speaking, unless you have a specific reason, you should use the stable release channel. These releases are intended for a general audience.
  • Rust is a good solution for: middle and large-size developers team; long-term usage in production; a code with regular support and/or refactor; a great number of existed unit-tests.

Rust was developed with aim to work on various programming platforms. And now it operates on Linux, Mac OS X, Windows, FreeBSD, Android, и iOS. Thanks to Rust wide functionality this language can be used for diverse tasks, such as:

  • front-end applications and interfaces;
  • device driver, games and signal handlers;
  • server-side applications;
  • real-time mode systems (e.g. operating system kernel);
  • embedded systems;
  • robotechnics;
  • web-frameworks;
  • large-scale, highly-productive, resource-intensive and complex software systems.

What’s the difference between Rust programming language and the other ones?

1) Rust is a safe alternative to C++ to make systems programmers more productive, mission-critical software less prone to memory exploits, and parallel algorithms more tractable.
2) The syntax of Rust is similar to C and C++. But despite the syntactic similarity, Rust is semantically very different from C and C++.
3) Rust object orientation isn’t as obvious and advanced as in Java, C#, and Python. Since Rust has no classes.
4) Rust’s more sophisticated than Go. In comparison with Go, Rust gives you larger control over memory and resources. This equates to writing code on a lower level.
5) Swift and Rust are both considered as substitution of C, C++ and ObjectiveC. Swift developers spend more time to make the code readable adding majority of syntactic sugar into the language. While Rust is more distant, it deals with minimum things.

Let’s observe how the competition of mentioned above languages can improve technical picture in the future. And we hope it will do a power of good.


It’s impossible to imagine any programming language without drawbacks. If it was so, we’d live in an ideal world. So, let’s back to reality and quickly determine the gaps in Rust.

  • Rust cannot prevent all kinds of software problems. Buggy code can and will be written in Rust. These things aren’t great, but they don’t qualify as unsafe specifically.
  • As a systems language, Rust operates at a low level. If you’re coming from a high-level language, there are some aspects of systems programming that you may not be familiar with.
  • It’s a pretty new language. So using it in development still brings the risk that Rust won’t survive for long and in a few years you need to rewrite it.
  • Considering the previous point, Rust tutorials are quite poor. But Rust’s still a comprehensive language. You can’t become familiar with it quickly and start writing professional code in just several weeks. It’s often needed to peruse RFC, blogs and even GitHub comments to find out necessary information. And still there is no dead certainty in it.
  • Rust isn’t as fast from the beginning as it is often told to be. You can write a fast code, but this still needs good optimization of your algorithms and program structure.
  • Rust compiler is rather strict. People call it a disciplinary language. Everything that isn’t obvious for Rust compiler you should specify on your own. Interestingly enough, when start coding with Rust you can be not aware of your intentions at all. So this learning barrier (altogether with the other ones) leads to the fact that the first Rust impression turns out to be frustrating.


And yet Rust itself hasn’t been standing still. So I’m pleased to mark an important milestone: with Firefox 48, Mozilla’s shipped its first Rust component to all desktop platforms in August, 2. Ralph Giles and Matthew Gregan implemented the component. For the Rust community as well, this is a real achievement: Rust code shipping to hundreds of millions of Firefox users. Seeing Rust code ships in production at Mozilla feels like the culmination of a long journey. But this is only the first step for Mozilla. For instance, Android support’s coming soon. And more to come! The latest ‘Stable’ version of Rust, 1.11 was announced in August 18, 2016.

There’s a lot more to say about what’s happened and what’s coming up in the Rust world. I however tried to dwell on the most essential and valuable details.

Now that you have Rust introduced, Altabel Group will help you start your first Rust project. And I personally would encourage you to play with this programming language. It’s a great time to get started, and increasingly, to get involved with something safe, speed and concurrent.

So are you ready to give Rust a try? We’d love to hear your comments!


Victoria Sazonchik

Victoria Sazonchik

Business Development Manager

Skype: victoria_sazonchik
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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


As the Internet of Things begins to revolutionize businesses, economies and our society, IoT platforms are coming up being the core basis in the overall IoT infrastructure. IoT platforms, in simple words, are just about connecting the sensors to data networks and integrating with back-end applications to provide insight into huge volumes of data.

However developing for the Internet of Things is a complicated undertaking, and almost nobody chooses to do it from scratch. IoT data platforms provide a starting point by integrating many of the tools needed to operate a deployment from device control to data prediction and grasp into one service. Ready-built IoT platforms can meet the needs of any company and smoothly accommodate constant growth and change. In the light of the possibilities offered by IoT, many high tech companies started taking advantage of it. For the time being there are more than 300 hundred various IoT platforms on the market and the number is continuing to grow. So, let’s see what features of IoT platforms take into consideration while choosing one for your business.

Before selecting an appropriate solution which may be suitable for your organization, you must determine:

1. Three different types of IoT platforms. Here they are listed from most complex to least complex:

  • Application enablement and development (AEP/ADP): This encompasses platforms that offer modules, widget-based frameworks or templates for producing (with minimal or no coding) actual end-user applications. These platforms are capable of turning data into either intelligence or action very quickly. The vivid examples of such platforms are Oracle, ThingWorx and etc.
  • Network/Data, and subscriber management (NM): In the wireless carrier and mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) space, this kind of platforms try to streamline connecting cellular M2M data, so you don’t have to build much of the data infrastructure behind it. For instance Cisco and Aeris do network management as well as device management, while Jasper and Wyless do more sheer network management.
  • Device management (DM): These platforms are more about monitoring device statuses, troubleshooting issues, configuring embedded device settings and administrating the provisioning and health of the endpoints. Usually in the IoT space this fairly elementary software is provided by hardware vendors. Like both Digi and Intel provide pure device cloud management.

While these platforms can be found as distinct standalone products, it is becoming increasingly common to find vendors that combine two or all three types in a single offering.

2. Implementation, integration support and device management. Device management is one of the most significant features expected from any IoT software platform. The IoT platform should maintain a number of devices connected to it and track their proper operation status; it should be able to handle configuration, firmware (or any other software) updates and provide device level error reporting and error handling. Ultimately, users of the devices should be able to get individual device level statistics.

To make implementation smooth, the provider should possess convincing manuals, blogs and feasibly lively developer-community around the IoT platform.

Support for integration is another vital feature expected from an IoT software platform. The API should provide the access to the important operations and data that needs to be disclosed from the IoT platform. It’s typical to use REST APIs to achieve this aim.

3. Comprehensive Information Security. There are four main technological building blocks of IoT: hardware, communication, software backend and applications. It’s essential that for all these blocks security is a must-have element. To prevent the vulnerabilities on all levels, the IoT infrastructure has to be holistically designed. On the whole, the network connection between the IoT devices and the IoT software platform would need to be encrypted and protected with a strong encryption mechanism to avoid potential attacks. By means of separation of IoT traffic into private networks, strong information security at the cloud application level, requiring regular password updates and supporting updateable firmware by way of authentication, signed software updates and so on can be pursued to enhance the level of security present in an IoT software platform. Nonetheless while security ought to be scalable, it is unfortunately usually a trade-off with convenience, quick workflows and project cost.

4. Flexible Database. There are four major “V” for databases in IoT space:

  • Volume (the database should be able to store massive amount of generated data)
  • Variety (the database should be able to handle different kind of data produced by various devices and sensors)
  • Velocity (the database should be able to make instant decisions while analyzing streaming data)
  • Veracity ( the database should be able to deal with ambiguous data in some cases produced by sensors)

Therefore an IoT platform usually comes with a cloud-based database solution, which is distributed across various sensor nodes.

5. Data analytics.

A lot of IoT cases go beyond just action management and require complicated analytics in order to get the most out of the IoT data-stream. There are four types of analytics which can be conducted on IoT data:

  • Real-time analytics (on the fly analysis of data),
  • Batch analytics (runs operations on an accumulated set of data),
  • Predictive analytics (makes predictions based on different statistical and machine learning technologies)
  • Interactive analytics (runs numerous exploratory analysis on either streaming or batch data)

While choosing the right IoT platform, it’s better to keep in mind that the analytics engine should comprise all dynamic calculations of sensor data, starting from basic data clustering to complex machine learning.

6. Pricing and the budget. The IoT platform market features a diversity of pricing methodologies underlying various business strategies. And sometimes providers’ costs aren’t always transparent. Thus it’s very important to check out all the nuances of your provider’s pricing pattern, so you are not plainly bought into introductory teaser rates or into the prices for the base model.

Further you should bear in mind that you licensing cost for the chosen platform is just the beginning. The major expense can turn out to be the integration itself, as well as hiring consultants (if you are not able to do it on your own) to support the system.

Therefore, it’s extremely vital to brainstorm what your entire IoT system will look like at scale and choose which features are most critical to you chiefly — and only afterwards decide what sort of platform you need.

A lot of companies do this backward. They get the IoT platform and believe they’re getting the complete necessary solution—then realize the mistake half a year into development. Thus it’s critical to be aware of this before you get started.

Also it should be mentioned that some companies don’t use IoT platforms—they’re developing their own platforms in-house. Yet, depending on how you want to go to market, it may be clever to research pre-built options. Depending on your situation, you may save a lot of time and money by partnering with one of these platforms.

Have you ever faced the difficulties of choosing the IoT platform for your business? If yes, can you please let me know what kind of difficulties? And what do you think is it better to use a ready-built IoT platform or develop your own from the scratch? Looking forward to getting your ideas and comments.


Anastasiya Zakharchuk

Anastasiya Zakharchuk

Business Development Manager

Skype: azakharchuk1
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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


It’s not a secret that technology does not stand still and every year gadgets are becoming smarter and the developers are trying to surprise users and make something incredible. Probably, one of the most expected smartphone of this year – is the new iPhone 7. It not only possesses all the necessary functions, but also belongs to the category of image devices.

As we have already known Apple will release its next-generation iPhone in a week, and with a launch date fast approaching, details about the new device have been leaking out at a rapid pace. As with most iPhone launches, we’ve seen a slew of rumors that have given us a solid look at what we can expect to see when Apple unveils its new iPhone on September 7.

Of course, as with any rumor cycle, we have seen some conflicting information, so there will still be an element of surprise when Apple CEO Tim Cook and other Apple executives debut the 2016 iPhone.

Well, let’s have a brief look of what we can expect from new iPhone 7.

Since the 3GS launched in 2009, Apple has used an alternating “S” naming formula to mark years where the iPhone does not receive a major redesign, saving its numbered upgrades for years where design changes are introduced. Releases have been as follows:

2007 – iPhone
2008 – iPhone 3G
2009 – iPhone 3GS
2010 – iPhone 4 (new design)
2011 – iPhone 4s
2012 – iPhone 5 (new design)
2013 – iPhone 5s
2014 – iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus (new design)
2015 – iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus

The next-generation iPhone is expected to be called the iPhone 7 and since we are expecting Apple to continue offering two versions of the iPhone – with 5.5 and 4.7-inch displays – we will also see an iPhone 7 Plus.

Every rumor we’ve heard about the iPhone 7’s look suggests Apple is aiming to make the iPhone 7 up to 1mm thinner, removing the headphone jack would be one way to help achieve this, forcing music fans to use wireless Bluetooth headphones, or headphones that connect via the Lightning port, or an adaptor, but other rumors suggest the iPhone 7 and 7 Plus will have a body that is the same thickness as the iPhone 6s.

A redesigned home button was one of the most active topics in the early iPhone 7 prediction conversation. The iPhone 7 would have a “Force Touch” home button. So instead of a physical mechanism, Apple will use its ‘Force Touch’ technology and a motor inside the iPhone to provide the sensation that the button is being physically depressed, similar to the “Force Click” touch pad included on the latest model MacBooks.

Many sources are expecting a significant step up in quality with the iPhone 7’s camera. New evidence appears to suggest that both new iPhone 7 models will have optical image stabilization capabilities. But a steady stream of sources have reported that the dual camera would likely be included on the 5.5-inch-screen iPhone 7 Plus and/or Pro and probably not the standard 4.7-inch-screen iPhone 7. The dual cameras in the iPhone 7 Plus will reportedly use two sensors to capture separate photos with different color patterns, merging them together for one final photograph. Capturing two images at once and merging them is expected to result in brighter, more detailed photos and better zoom functionality.

It’s also going to have faster processor, as the new version is expected to run on a new A10 chip that could be 50 per cent faster than the current A9X, with 3GB of RAM and a 2.37GHZ processor. Numerous sources have suggested that the phone will have 3GB of RAM, where the current model has 2GB.

As battery life remains one of the biggest complaints that users have against the iPhone, the new version will have a 1735 mAh capacity battery and the iPhone 7 Plus a 2810 mAh one – up from 1715 mAh and 2750 mAh respectively.

We can expect that Apple will continue on its path of introducing more powerful, efficient devices with each design iteration. The iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus are expected to include next-generation A10 processors manufactured by TSMC. Internal storage space is getting a boost, with entry-level devices expected to start at 32GB instead of 16GB, and up to 256GB of storage may be available.

What is more, a part leak suggests the iPhone 7 could include dual SIM trays to allow the device to send and receive calls and messages from multiple phone numbers. Dual SIM trays would also allow the iPhone 7 to work with multiple carriers at the same time, ideal for traveling.

Another possible advantage of the new iPhone may be full waterproofing. Instead of adding armour to the outside of the iPhone to protect it from water, the method would coat electronic components found inside the iPhone in a protective waterproof material that would prevent them from getting damaged should water find its way in. If waterproofing the internals of the iPhone 7 doesn’t sound impressive enough to you, the next rumour might. It was published that the iPhone 7 could be waterproof – but not by creating a watertight body, or even waterproofing the internals. Instead, the patent suggests that the iPhone could dry itself by pumping water (or any other liquid, for that matter) out of the device via its speaker grills. Pretty cool, eh?

Well, my review is coming to the end. I hope you have found this information useful.

What do you think about these new features? Please feel free to share your thoughts with us. Thank you in advance!


Kate Kviatkovskaya

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Business Development Manager

Skype: kate.kviatkovskaya
LI Profile: Kate Kviatkovskaya



Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


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Wearable tech devices, such as smart watches and bracelets, have firmly stepped into our everyday life and accompany us in different spheres of life. And who knows, we may soon witness the next tech revolution in the wearable world.

Microsoft Research and MIT Media Lab PhD students have teamed up to create the next level of wearable: temporary smart tattoos.

The technology is named DuoSkin. These tattoos consist of artistic arrangements of conductive gold and silver leaf, plus tissue-thin electronics. Users can apply the tattoo to their body with a wet cloth, similar to any other temporary tattoo.

The fabrication process is fairly simple: first, you design a stencil with any graphic design software, and cut the pattern out of tattoo paper and vinyl. Then you place the gold leaf layer on top to create conductivity, and attach surface-mount electronics.

Smart tattoos can be used for several purposes. Firstly, the tattoo can act as an interface that can be used, for example, as a trackpad or a button to remotely control devices. It may be quite demanding in the near future as our devices get smaller and smart tattoos could provide some additional auxiliary area, without carrying a larger device. Secondly, they can track and show users information about themselves, for example they can change color depending on the user’s mood or show body temperature. A third possible function is wireless communication. The tattoo could include an NFC (near field communications) tag, an electrical component that includes small microchips to store data that can be read by phones or other NFC devices nearby. In the near future, the technology could serve as a substitute for identification, subway cards, etc.

Cindy Hsin-Liu Kao, the lead researcher, calls DuoSkin a “project” and not a product or prototype. Others may use this information as a basis to create their own personalized on-skin wearables.

Lets’s think a bit out of the box:) The future presented in some fantastic films is about to come to reality: not more physical devices but different tattoos and built-in chips:) Аnd what do you think about smart tattoos? Will they change the wearable world or will soon be forgotten?


Anna Kozik

Business Development Manager

Skype: kozik_anna
LI Profile: Anna Kozik



Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


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