Altabel Group's Blog

Archive for September 2013

The digital age has changed customer behavior forever. They have no patience with 9 to 5 and they’re shredding the concept of after-hours and weekends. They have a voice, and that voice demands to be heard whenever, wherever.

Working hours, what’s that?

Banks—previously such strict observers of “working hours” all over the globe—have risen to the challenge by embracing technology. Net banking and ATMs have virtually done away with the need to visit those hallowed brick-and-mortar portals. Mobile payments are being made directly from person to person, minimizing the need for even small amounts of cash. While this is great news for all of us as individuals, the risk for the bank is that it becomes a marginal player in the life of the valued customer.

Let’s take a look at E-commerce. This is the case with several consumer-facing industries, such as cloth, books, groceries, appliances, furniture and such—all of which can be ordered online and delivered while you are away at work. No interface or face-to-face conversation with the company required.  Especially when you’re working from home, you meet the shipping company rep rather than someone from the company you ordered the goods from.  This is perfectly okay for the average buyer, except when something goes wrong!

Say you ordered blue curtains, but what you saw is not what you got. Colors on the digital screen often look different than when seen off-screen. Simply returning what’s arrived is not the solution. Speaking to someone and explaining what you had in mind so you get the right product is. This means that online dealers need to have someone customers can have a live discussion with. Beyond a live agent, online dealers more than ever are finding customers who expect to engage in live conversations any time of the day. Research by Social Bakers, an agency that measures how well brands perform in terms of social customer care, found that the number of questions asked on brand pages on Facebook has increased by 85 percent over the last year, and that airlines had the best response rate of answering 79 percent of these promptly. “Working hours” is not a phrase that works anymore.

Engage, not enrage
Companies selling anything at all cannot afford to be out of touch with their customers. So while digitization may keep the consumer from physically visiting you, it has also forged a path for newer ways in which to meet up through social media. Businesses are following their clients where they go, meeting them where they hang out, not in their offices but online.

Have you noticed that the online store you bought something from recently keeps popping up not only when you google something but also on all kinds of websites that you visit? That’s because The Web knows and tracks your online preferences. Personally, I find pop-ups asking to indulge in a live chat very intrusive—it’s like a store attendant following you everywhere and asking, “Can I help you?”  While it’s good to know there’s someone who can answer your queries, nobody likes to be stalked.

Smart businesses know how to keep track of the customer without being obviously there.

Keeping them engaged is in fact a bigger challenge than ever before since your customer can close that communication window with just a click.

Fly with the experts

Let us take an example of an airline that’s effectively engaging with customers. Lufthansa has its fingers on the pulse of the customer, and potential ones, through an enviable Facebook presence. Contests, events, quizzes all have earned the airline something every self-respecting Facebooker looks for—likes! Over 300,000 likes (on the India page alone), and if even a small percentage decides to fly with it because of the online excitement generated, that’s a big win.

Understandably, retailers and consumer-facing companies have a big Facebook presence. Coca-cola, Starbucks, McDonald’s, Walmart, Levi’s, Target, Nike, Kohl’s are among those that have the highest number of likes. Twitter accounts of many of these companies also have a very, very large number of followers. Clearly, they have managed to reach out effectively to their potential customers using social media.

What to outsource!?

These are still early days for outsourcing social media marketing and engagement, but it makes sense to outsource at least some of your efforts to begin with. Look holistically at your social media marketing plans and start by assessing what skills you have in-house and skills you are lacking. You may decide to start with getting the design and development built by an outsourcer to get your framework up front.

Other areas to consider include:

Savvy social media writers may be a skill your current writing team lacks, so content writing could be a place with clear payback. If you’re content doesn’t attract and maintain customers, you could be doing more harm than good to your brand.

Analytics can easily be done by a third-party and is probably the least vulnerable to subjectivity. That will save precious resources that you can deploy towards strategizing and hiring in-house of local experts to manage the customer community.

Customer experience management or customer care is another area to consider, especially if your customers are global and resident in different time zones. Be cautious to consider outsourcers who understand your business and your customer engagement model.  Since the outsourcer will be “you” during customer interactions, you need to feel confident they can successfully represent your brand.

Needless to say, do monitor what’s going on closely enough so you can step in when necessary. The important thing now is to be open for business all the time. Not just 24/7 but 24/7/365 and even up to 366 in a leap year!  Business process outsourcing companies are gearing up to meet the demand when it arises. That will finally help harried executives to get their well-earned weekend off to do their own personal networking, online or otherwise.

Testing could be outsourced. Minimizing risks and cost either manual testing or automotive one can easily be performed by third party.

Recently we could see the most prospective and fast growing social spheres that potentially need and could outsource a big part of them. There are:

–   Banking /finance

–   Mobile development sectorE-commerce

–   E-commerce

–   Medical/health care

–   Tourism

Has your organization outsourced marketing and customer engagement yet?

Polina Mikhan

Polina Mikhan
Polina.Mikhan@altabel.com 
Skype ID: poly1020
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

Among posts published in our blog, there are many about CMSs: Umbraco, Joomla, Drupal, Magento, WordPress etc. But one that slipped under our attention is Sitecore CMS.

What is Sitecore?
Sitecore is software Development Company that provides enterprise website, intranet, portal and marketing automation software. Sitecore offers two major products: CMS and its fully integrated “Customer Engagement Platform” which allows seamless integration between its major components: Web Content Management (CMS), Customer Engagement Platform, DMS (Digital Marketing System), E-commerce services, Sitecore Intranet Portal (SIP), Sitecore Foundry.

The Sitecore CMS – an introduction.
Sitecore CMS is .NET-based content management system and vc. Open source .NET based management systems (like Umbraco or Kentico for example), it’s paid resource. It’s not cheap (the cheapest Sitecore license starts around €10k and quickly goes up from there and then you still need to buy support) and depending on this fact the target market of this CMS is big enterprises such as Toshiba, Siemens, KIA, Mazda, Canon, Nestle, Microsoft, including government websites of Denmark. A full list of companies you could find by following this link.

Lunched in 2001 Sitecore’s CMS popularity has been growing over the last few years. According to the results of annual statistics, Sitecore demonstrated good results and what is particular important it is global player and highly competitive US and UK markets.

Sitecore’s benefits.
The Sitecore CMS is considered a pretty good product for its flexibility, scalability and accessibility to the widest range of businesses. Flexibility is an area in which Sitecore CMS excels as it is fully customizable and extendable, and practically anything can be overridden or extended. Scalability – Sitecore CMS is highly scalable and has been architected to scale extremely well, allowing organizations to grow and expand. Accessability – Sitecore is used by many companies, ranging from small and middle-sized to global leading ones.

Let’s have a look also at Sitecore’s benefits from a technical perspective:
• SQL Server and Oracle support allows flexible and hierarchical data storage;
• Simple and understandable API for technical specialists;
• Ability to configure and expand by increasing the pipelines supply, event handing, etc.;
• The engine dynamically collects and cashes management components that help to create solutions to re-use the code;
• Device management – designate page elements and other content for different clients (browser, PDF, XML, feed) or for mobile devices.
• ASP.NET Membership Services manage security, authentication, authorization, roles and profiles
• Workflow facilities make it possible to quickly define sophisticated material before being published
• Media Library provides storage of huge amount of items/data
• Integration with Visual Studio 2010 IDE

How to decide whether Sitecore is the best choice for your company.
If you decide that your company needs a CMS solution you probably need to make first steps towards understanding your use and defining requirements. If to speak about Sitecore CMS we’ve prepared some tips to find out if Sitecore is a good option for your company:
– You/your development team are fluent with .NET (C#, ASP.NET);
– You have a good sized website to host;
– You’re willing/ready to invest and migrate all your websites and web apps into a .NET environment;
– You agree with the payback period that could take over 1 year or longer depending on what you spend to implement and what customization you have done.

One more hot issue to consider is whether you’re ready to go with the paid license. Sitecore CMS is a paid one, it’s not open source. So you should pay for support and access to the code base if you need to create a highly customized deployment with heavy involvement from your team.

So to end up the abovementioned I could say that from technical point of view Sitecore is really looks great and it’s very powerful player among other management systems on the market as it is thoughtfully designed and well developed.

Thank you for your attention to my post and if you have any comments about any aspect of the Sitecore CMS, please feel free to leave your comments.

 

Katerina Bulavskaya

Business Development Manager

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com

The practice of renting virtualised pools of servers and storage over the net is known as infrastructure as a service (IaaS), and is the most popular class of cloud service available today.

But most businesses are only making limited use of IaaS, with the majority restricting their use to spinning up application development and test environments or to rapidly provisioning extra server capacity during periods of heavy demand.

The reasons for this limited adoption are many: concerns about security of data and systems controlled by a third party, worries over the reliability of systems run by a cloud provider and served over the internet, and the premium paid for getting a vendor to provide infrastructure over running it in-house.

But where demand for IT services is uneven, fluctuating between high and low-demand, or where a business needs infrastructure to test applications for a short period or to try out a new endeavour, it can be more cost effective and far quicker to rent infrastructure from a cloud provider than attempting to build it in-house. There are even instances of companies like Netflix, which runs its entire IT operation on Amazon Web Services’ infrastructure.

AWS main IaaS offerings are EC2, which provides compute on demand and S3, which provides storage on demand. EC2 gives companies access to virtual machines or instances running an OS and applications of their choice over the internet, with these instances being configurable and controllable via web service APIs. Alongside and on top of these EC2 and S3 AWS provides a range of cloud offerings related to networking, load balancing, databases, data warehousing and big data analysis, as well as a range of management tools.

At the AWS Enterprise Summit in London on Tuesday businesses broadly outlined the ways they are using AWS today and lessons that can be learned from their experience.

Application development and testing
Developers and testers commonly use a self-service approach to draw computing resources from the likes of AWS EC2, S3 and Amazon’s block level storage service EBS. Typically this will be carried out via a self service portal, such as AWS’ own CloudFormation, or via some other form of API call.

Businesses often create self-service enterprise portals that automatically restrict how much computing resource should be provisioned and for how long based on governance and workflow requirements, and that tag the resources that are appropriate for different teams.

Businesses are using EC2 to enable standard build developer/test workstations, add integrated project management and issue tracking, to run popular source control systems and to drive build servers and continuous integration, according to Yuri Misnik, head of solutions architecture at AWS.

On the testing side EC2 instances are being used to allow unit and regression tests to be scaled up and run in parallel in a fraction of the time of doing it in-house, for A/B scenario testing to be run on replica stacks and for the creation of sandboxes for security testing, said Misnik. For testing how applications perform under load, he said, customers sometimes use spot instances – a pricing model where customers bid for time on unused EC2 instances – as a cost effective way of stressing applications.

AWS has a number of pricing models for renting infrastructure, based on how customers want to use it. For instance on-demand instances let customers pay for compute capacity by the hour with no long term commitments, while reserved instances require a one-time up front payment in return for a significant discount to the hourly rate. Customers can save a lot of money by ensuring the pricing model they use is best suited to their need, said Misnik, citing a customer that saved 45 percent cost by transitioning to reserved instances. AWS provides a tool Trusted Advisor, which makes recommendations on how customers can save money and improve performance or security.

Entertainment conglomerate Lionsgate, has used EC2 to develop and test SAP apps, reducing deployment time from weeks to days, as has Galata Chemicals, which reduced the cost of running development and testing operations by 70 percent by moving to EC2.

Building and running new application
The UK broadcaster Channel 4 launched its first live application on AWS in 2008 and today runs all of its new web apps on the infrastructure.

Describing the benefits of running apps on AWS, Bob Harris, chief technology officer with Channel 4, name-checked agility, scalability and resilience.

“We get servers up and running for teams in minutes, if it’s urgent, or hours,” he said.

The broadcaster sees “a huge increase in productivity” among teams building apps running on AWS, said Harris, because of the development team’s ability to deploy or destroy virtual servers and apps as and when they need to.

That freedom to spin up new instances has a downside, however.

“One of the things it lets you do is be inefficient far more efficiently,” said Harris.

“People tend to start instances, maybe they start more than they need or too big. So we’ve have a constant battle over the past couple of years making sure that we’re keeping our house in order behind us.”

Tools like Trusted Advisor are designed to help keep on top of this problem by flagging up the number of instances being used.

For a broadcaster that has to deal with spikes in traffic to its web sites and apps after popular TV programmes are broadcast, and doesn’t want to have to buy excess capacity for one time peaks in demand, the scalability of AWS was a good fit, said Harris.

“The peaky workloads are the important ones. In the past you had to explain to the marketing manager those 404s were a sign of success because it showed how much traffic came to your website. Today I can’t remember the last time that happened on a Channel 4 website.”

Harris estimates that the total cost of ownership for running these services on AWS is more than five times lower than running it off in-house infrastructure.

He stressed the need to build services that worked well with horizontal scaling across different EC2 instances as demand increased. Licensing of back-end software is another consideration, with Harris saying that there are still difficulties with software vendors being tied to a per machine or per CPU socket licensing model, which is obviously a poor fit for EC2 where software can be running on a varying number of virtual and physical machines based on demand.

“My personal view is that a significant number of proprietary models are simply not cloud-friendly because they don’t allow us to take advantage of that flexibility. Cloud plus open source is really the place you need to be if you want high scalability,” he said.

Proprietary software vendors are beginning to make concessions for running their software in the cloud, with Microsoft, SAP, Oracle and IBM offering licence mobility deals for their major software packages to AWS customers that are a better fit for cloud computing’s scalable pay per use model.

Augment on-premise systems and run hybrid apps
Hybrid apps are those that rely on a mixture of back-end services running on both in-house and AWS infrastructure.

AWS provides multiple features to help companies building hybrid apps integrate their datacentres with AWS infrastructure in a secure fashion, such as AWS Direct Connect and Virtual Private Cloud.

Access controls similar to those within in-house datacentres can be set on AWS infrastructure using its Identity and Access Management tools while AWS CloudHSM (hardware security modules) are ultra secure key management appliances which can be used by customers who have to follow stringent data protection regulations so they are able to move data onto AWS infrastructure.

Another approach taken by businesses is to offload certain systems to AWS: Nokia runs analysis on data stored on Amazon’s Redshift data warehousing platform, allowing it to reduce cost by up to 50 percent and run queries up to twice as fast compared to its previous data warehouse.

Channel 4 is using AWS Elastic Map Reduce (EMR) service, the AWS-hosted Hadoop framework running on EC2 and S3, to analyse web logs from its sites going back a number of years and hone ad-targeting and programme recommendations.

Channel 4’s Harris said that EMR provides a way for the broadcaster to experiment without the commitment of an up front investment, an important consideration when the outcome of big data analysis is uncertain.

“It’s about the cost of exit – how much money have I sunk if I’ve to walk away. In big data we’re all trying to work out ‘What’s the real value of a better ad target?’, it’s a hard analysis to do. Imagine if I wanted to ramp my physical platform by ten or more times, we’re talking tens of millions of pounds. By the time I’ve also hired the half a dozen people to run this thing this is seriously expensive.”

AWS’ Misnik also said some businesses are using AWS infrastructure as a cloud-based disaster recovery site, running anything up to hot standby environments with rapid failover.

Migrating existing apps to the cloud
Migrating apps running on in-house infrastructure to AWS is less common, as it presents a number of challenges.

Matthew Graham-Hyde, CIO of the media conglomerate Kantar Group, said getting a migrated app to work requires both re-engineering the app and working out the right mix of cloud infrastructure it needs to sit upon.

“It’s a very different working model when you take an application and re-engineer it for the cloud,” he said, for instance so it is able to scale across available instances based on demand and exploit the distributed nature of the cloud architecture to become more resilient to failure.

“You have to have everyone in the room – your infrastructure architects, sysadmins, business analysts, developers, consulting partners – and you’re ripping up installation after installation as you re-engineer this application to get the true benefits of being a cloud application. It’s a very iterative model.”

Kantar has migrated a number of apps to AWS, including a third party data visualisation tool whose running costs have dropped by 50 percent since the move.

AWS recommends migrating apps that are under-utilised, that have an immediate need to scale or that simply are the easiest to move. Examples of apps and systems that should prove more straightforward to migrate are, AWS claims: web apps, batch processing systems, content management systems, digital asset management systems, log processing systems, collaborative tools and big data analytics platforms.

Another company that claims to have benefited from shifting existing systems to AWS is the pharmaceutical firm Bristol-Myers Squibb, which migrated its clinical trial simulation platform, with the result that simulation times have been reduced from 60 hours down to 1.3 hours and reduced costs by 60 percent.

Everything in the cloud
Video streaming company Netflix is one of the few firms to have dispensed of its in-house datacentres entirely in favour running its entire infrastructure on top of AWS services.

The spiky nature of customer traffic means Netflix is a good match for the scalability offered by EC2. Netflix uses thousands of EC2 instances in multiple regions and across the various AWS availability zones to support more than 33 million customers worldwide.

Not having to run IT infrastructure has freed up the IT team at Netflix to devote time to improving the performance or features of the company’s IT services. But Netflix is also an example of the amount of work needed to go “all-in” on cloud – the company has devoted a lot of time to making AWS work as a platform for its business (going as far as to develop the Chaos Monkey software that breaks parts of production systems to test overall resiliency), the latency inside a distributed architecture and limitations on compute storage and networking that come with sharing a server’s resources with other customers.
 

Kristina Kozlova

Marketing Manager

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com

When looking for a suitable web framework you could definitely come across – Symfony and Yii – top PHP frameworks. But what to choose?  Most interviewed developers prefer Symfony than Yii. Let’s see why.

 

Code maintenance and management. I believe there is no problem to create a code from the very beginning. Still when it is a long term project there could arise some issues – for instance, after several months of the development on Yii there could arise some problems with small workarounds, hooks…it would definitely work but supporting would kill you. Protection from corruption is quite important for every company but who would like to care about hooks and workarounds everyday if these issues could be avoided?

Style of the code. Yii team has their own code style, it’s great. Still it can be a problem in case you have a project with different code guidelines than Yii team use. Sure, you can contribute some extensions in Yii community and save the extensions similar to native Yii code. But in the end you would have to switch between different code guidelines all the time – not great. Namespaces. Namespaces helps to shortcut class names, helps with classes autoloading etc. Yii doesn’t not use them. I believe you would feel more comfortable with namespaces.

Test driven development (TDD) issue. As for code testing, tests should be written easily. In case Yii, its global service locator (Yii::app()) destroys attempts to write tests. Starting with one test, after some time you would understand that you would need to mock this service and another one, and both of them depends on 3rd service…in the end  many services interact with each other in Yii L As a result we get tight coupling, which is tricky for performing decoupling application.

Thus, in spite of Yii has CWebTestCase, fixtures, base integration with phpunit etc it is more useful to test services/models without mocking other services and framework classes.

ActiveRecord. Having ActiveRecords as framework core is great, it’s really useful for beginner. Still Yii active record is too simplified and tightly coupled. Another more serious issue – there is no separation between entity and entity manager. Using Yii we have to use static methods for querying models and non-static methods for model logic. ActiveRecord and ActiveFinder are provided by a single instance in Yii and there could be a trouble when queries mixed with entity getter/setter.

Ah, regarding to static methods for querying, they can’t have state except for static one. And if you want to mix few conditions you have to merge criterias. What is Symfony in this case about? It has Doctrine 2 – quite serious ORM with unit of work and other cool things. Or as an option you can try Propel ORM. There is the things you would really like: real getter/setter, db schemas and migrations generation, behaviors that actually a generator addons, reach set of generator properties and integration in some Symfony components like forms and validator. It has some issues as well, still it works better and you can get clear separation between entities and queries.

Extensions. As for  extension in Yii, firstly you should find and download it on the Yii site,  manually copy it to the project directory, attach it in config. And then to monitor the site for updates. Such procedure is not comfortable for 21th  century. Composer could be a great choice in this case. You can easily define project dependency and run update. It download extension/lib/component/bundle or whatever you want, setup autoloading and you can use it. Also composer cares about all component dependencies and downloads them.  All components can be updated to most up-to-date version with one command. Also you can specify which version to use: to download test or dev versions , it’s easy!

There is another cool thing – contributing. It’s easy to publish your package and make it globally available, easier to define versions, easier to fork extensions, easier to send pull requests etc.

Now some short facts about Symphony:

  •         Symfony is not a framework but a project. Depending on your needs, you can choose to use some of the Symfony Components, the Silex micro-framework, or the full-stack framework.
  •         Symfony is used by many large companies (like the BBC or CBS), by many large websites (like TEDwetter.comLockers) and some Open-Source projects are also powered by Symfony (CMSes likeDrupal or eZpublish, libraries like PHPUnit or Doctrine, products like phpBB orshopware).
  •         Symfony enjoys a huge community of users and contributors; during the last year alone, 550+ people contributed to the Symfony core and the community created over 1,600 bundles for the full-stack framework. Symfony also has several annual dedicated conferences around the world and a large number of user groups.
  •         Symfony has been created in 2005 and here to stay. Besides SensioLabs, many other companies rely on Symfony for their clients and they contribute, invest money, and sponsor the future of the project.
  •         Symfony embraces the “don’t reinvent the wheel” philosophy, and provides tight integration with many other Open-Source projects.
  •        Symfony tries to bring innovation to PHP: it was one of the first major frameworks to embrace PHP 5.3, to introduce the usage of a Dependency Injection container, and to use a templating engine for its templates by default,Twig, which is now also adopted by major CMSes like Drupal and eZpublish. Symfony also has some unique features like its gorgeous debug toolbar and its great built-in profiler.

Conclusion. In case you would like to create a small blog – Yii would be a great choice. If you are going to develop a serious application, if you know why you need a Dependency Injection, and need to cover most of the code tests, need a super plug-in architecture, work with migrations and a fixture – only Symfony.

Thank you for your attention and look forward to your thoughts.

Elvira Golyak

Elvira Golyak
Elvira.Golyak@altabel.com
Skype ID: elviragolyak
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

Every now and then it happens that customers and software development vendors stop understanding each other which leads to wasteful argues, mutual accusations and can even end with the complete project crash. By the nature of the profession I constantly work somewhere in between the client side and the programmers’ one. Basing on this experience I can say for sure – that’s not developers/testers/PM’s who are always to be blamed – the customers also should understand the basic behavioral models and principles of work. I’m not saying the client shall grovel through the whole available literature on the software development methodology.  Often, it’s enough to keep in mind simple but useful tips that will save lots of time, money and keep the both parties’ nervous system robust.

1)      Take an active part in the project, don’t restrain yourself 🙂
Basically there are 2 situations possible: when there is a detailed technical spec and when there is not. Even when there is – if developers pose questions, it means they really need the information for your business success, first of all. So, I’d really advise you to find at least 10 minutes  to respond to the posed questions. If there is no spec and the process is going iteratively, it’s even more important for you to discuss the functionality needed. The more the BA/developer (depending on the project size/needs) knows – the more quality the product is – the less time consuming the development process – the more successful your business is.

The most important thing to understand here is that, above all, it’s your business, your product, your tastes and your vision. The thing which is completely obvious and logical for one person may not be clear at all to the other. Vendor companies can definitely advise/suggest (and they actually should), but the customers shall take an active part in the discussion. Depending on the product goal, sometimes even some simple “register” button can play the crucial part in the whole business. It’s always better to ask and make the required thing at once, then remake it again and again wasting time and patience.

2)      If you are a Big Boss and simply don’t have time to take this active part described above, appoint a person who can substitute you fully in the decision-making process and whose competence and vision you trust.

3)      There always shall be one person who is fully responsible for the whole project, not two, three or ten. Don’t share responsibility with your marketing assistant, accountant, art-director, system administrator, chief locksmith and charwoman. Ok, I’ve overplayed a bit 🙂 Marketing assistant and technical director can definitely advise on this and that but the final decision is always made by one person. Thus, it is always known who is responsible without shifting the duties between different departments.

4)      Working out the prototype, think only about the main and the most important functionality. All bells and whistles will come afterwards. If you can not define which detail is more significant and which is less, let the competent people like Requirements or Business analyst help you.

5)      Deadline is a mutual concern.
Actually, it’s an extension of point 1. If you set a tight deadline, please, ple-e-e-a-a-se don’t leave for a 3-hour lunch or for a vacation leaving the developers without the required info/docs at the last project stages. They’re upset, you’re upset (especially after vacation – I bet!). In the end, it’s a loose-loose game.

6)      Listen to the programmers’ advice.
You’re not obliged to carry into effect everything they say, but try to take to heart at least part of it. Especially if you have no clue about all these offbeat terms like .NET, PHP, Java, Apache etc. and want to develop your own e-commerce system, for example. You’d better listen to the technical people in this case – not all the systems are made hands down with the help of some free ready template. It will take you some time to listen but instead will save lots of time and money. Who knows – probably they will say something useful? 🙂

If you are a rather large non-IT company, it’s actually better to entrust the process optimization to the professionals. There are always Requirements and Business Analysts who are ready to help and advice.

7)      The following (and the last for now :)) tip is applicable for the life situations in general, not only in the sphere of software development. Golden rule, so to say. Every dispute, every problem, every issue can be settled and solved without shouts and emotional accusations. If there is already a problem, it makes no sense anymore to constantly clarify who is the one to blame. The parties should already think over the way out by the means of a constructive dialogue. Not in a different way. Let’s treat each other respectfully.

True – in our company there are such people like me who help establishing this communication bridge between the customers and tech guys, thus avoiding lots of embarrassing moments. Still I vote for the world peace J and constant mutual understanding. So I hope that these tips will help us in the uphill struggle of building a beneficial cooperation in the sphere of software development.

I’d be really glad to see here both parties’ opinion – customers’ and vendors’ one. Probably, you have your own list of tips or interesting moments/situations to tell about – share with us! 🙂

Thank you.

 

Nadya Klim

Business Development Manager

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com


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