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Archive for the ‘Java’ Category

JavaScript is the most accessible cross-platform language nowadays. It’s used both on front-end and back-end website development.

Using it Altabel developers create web-apps which includes offline mode, desktop apps, apps for smartphones and tablets, add-ins for Microsoft Office, SharePoint and Dynamics. And if you don’t get acquainted with JavaScript yet we strongly believe that you should do it immediately!

I reckon many of us know there are plenty of different languages compiled in JavaScript. It’s CoffeeScript, Dart, GorillaScript and others. To be fair some of these languages are fly-by-night creations that have never really taken off in the wild. But many of these languages are major engineering efforts with large ecosystems and large corporate backers. With so many frameworks and languages out there it can be difficult to figure out which one is the best.

In 2012 Microsoft analyzed the situation and created a new language with a possibility of dealing with problems and using existing JavaScript insights. Thus, a free open source programming language TypeScript was developed and maintained by Anders Hejlsberg (co-creator of Turbo Pascal, Delphi and C#). From the very beginning the new language started expanding rather quickly due to its flexibility and productivity. Considerable amount of projects written in JavaScript began to transfer to TypeScript. Popularity and relevancy of the new language leaded to the fact that lots of TypeScript ideas became the part of new JavaScripts standard afterwards. And moving forward the AngularJS 2.0 version (today one of the most popular web frameworks) was completely written on TypeScript with the help of Microsoft and Google.

But why TypeScript?

Let’s review main reasons of its popularity:

  • TypeScript is a typed superset of JavaScript. In other words any valid JavaScript code is also valid for TypeScript.
  • TypeScript may be used to develop JavaScript applications for client-side or server-side execution.

Microsoft’s TypeScript seems to generate the most attractive code and is considered to be one of the best JavaScript front-ends. TypeScript adds sweetness, but at a price.

  • TypeScript can also be used with existing JavaScript frameworks/libraries such as Angular, jQuery, and others and can even catch type issues and provide enhanced code help as you build your apps.
  • TypeScript can be just the right fit for projects in which developers try to remain relevant without the need to learn a whole new syntax.

The ubiquity of JavaScript as a runtime has inspired people from a variety of programming backgrounds to recreate JavaScript as they see fit. And yes, TypeScript lets you write JavaScript the way you really want to.

  • TypeScript differs from JavaScript with possibility of evident static objectives, with usage maintenance of full-blown classes (just as in traditional object-oriented languages), and also with maintenance of logging on modules. It’s aimed at development speed raising, simplifying of legibility, refactoring and reusability of your code.
  • TypeScript has many additional language features but defining types and creating classes, modules, and interfaces are some of the key features it offers.
  • In TypeScript the same types are supported as well you would expect it in JavaScript. Types enable TypeScript developers to use highly-productive development tools and practices: static checking, symbol-based navigation, statement completion and code refactoring.
  • TypeScript implements many conceptions that are appropriate to object-oriented languages such as extending, polymorphism, encapsulation, accessibility modifiers and so on.
  • Lots of TypeScript features have strict rules, so various code formatting errors are excluded. Which means that the possibility of incorrect implementation or inaccurate method invocations is eliminated.
  • TypeScript potentially allows writing large complex programs more quickly. Thereafter it’s easier to maintain, develop, adjust to scale and test them in comparison with standard JavaScript.

Drawbacks

TypeScript has a number of other positive features that are out of the scope of this article. On the other hand, there are two significant minuses exist.

  • Probably, the biggest minus is entry threshold and number of specialists on the market. Nowadays there are not so many specialists with solid experience in this language.
  • In comparison with JavaScript, it’s needed more time for the development. It stems from the fact that apart from class implementation one should describe all enabled interfaces and method signatures.

TypeScript 2.0

There are some significant changes coming in TypeScript 2.0 that continue to deliver on the promise of making JavaScript scale. This includes a whole rewrite of the way types are analysed in the flow of the code and an opt-in feature that starts to deal with logic errors around the flexibility of things being undefined or null in JavaScript. Other features planned for TypeScript 2.0 include read-only properties and async/await downlevel support.

TypeScript creator Anders Hejlsberg already has plans for TypeScript 2.1 and beyond. Features envisioned for these releases include a new JavaScript language service in Microsoft’s Visual Studio software development platform and more refactoring support.

The most recent version, TypeScript 1.8, rolled out in February, includes several more features like F-Bounded polymorphism, string literal types, etc.

Conclusion

So, if you haven’t taken a look at TypeScript, I have hopefully convinced you that it is something to at least worth a bit of your time. It has some of the best minds focused on making JavaScript scale and the team is going about it in a way that is open and transparent. By embracing the reality of JavaScript and building on top of it, in my opinion TypeScript is transforming the common language of the web, for the better.

We will be happy to hear how you use TypeScript in your current projects, if you like it, if you are planning to switch to this language, what are the pros and cons in your opinion, etc. Feel free to share with your thoughts in comments below!

 

Victoria Sazonchik

Victoria Sazonchik

Business Development Manager | LI Profile

E-mail: victoria.sazonchik@altabel.com
Skype: victoria_sazonchik
www.altabel.com

 

“Computer programming is an art, because it applies accumulated knowledge to the world, because it requires skill and ingenuity, and especially because it produces objects of beauty.”
Donald Knuth, 1974

 

It’s better to start your journey into the career of programming by answering the question “Do you really need programming?” This question does not apply to those, who majored in computer programming or was close to it. If at school you were good at math, if you like to spend a lot of time sitting in front of the computer, if you want to learn something new, then programming is for you. What is more, this area is now in demand and highly paid in the world, job vacancies for the post of programmers are always open. Isn’t it the best time to be a programmer?:)

Everyone knows that the future programmer should be able to think broadly and to present the project from different perspectives before its implementation and realization. Unfortunately, the machine does not understand a human language. Of course, I’m not talking about Siri and other voice recognition — I’m talking about the creation of new software. To create the calculator, the computer needs to be given the task in the same way as the foreman explains to workers how to lay bricks. That’s why you can’t do anything without understanding the programming languages. Well, first you need to decide what kind of programming languages we should start with.

And here everyone chooses a language which will be useful for him. It depends on the kind of products you are going to develop. Most of us studied Turbo Pascal at school, and it’s no news that this language is practically not used anymore. So, if you want to join the team of programmers in the nearest future, the choice of language should be made sensibly.

Among the most popular programming languages in 2016 are Java, followed by C languages, then Python, JavaScript, PHP, Ruby, etc. It should come as no surprise that the more popular language is, the more chances you have to find work in the future. So, you’d better start with Java or C#, as these are the best paid and relatively simple learning languages of writing code. If you can’t cope with them, then you should try to learn Python. This language suits for quick and effective programming.

But if you have no programming experience at all you can start with something more simple for understanding. Good examples can be the basics of HTML and CSS.

Why? These two languages are essential for creating static web pages. HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) structures all the text, links, and other content you see on a website. CSS is the language that makes a web page look the way it does—color, layout, and other visuals we call style. Well, if you are interested in making websites, you should definitely start with HTML and CSS.

Let’s move to JavaScript. It is the first full programming language for many people. Why? It is the next logical step after learning HTML and CSS. JavaScript provides the behavior portion of a website. For example, when you see that a form field indicates an error, that’s probably JavaScript at work.

JavaScript has become increasingly popular, and it now lives outside web browsers as well. Learning JavaScript will put you in a good place as it becomes a more general-purpose language.

Some people also suggest choosing Python as the first programming language because Python’s program code is readable, first of all. You don’t even need to be a programmer to understand what is happening in the program. Due to the simple syntax of Python you will need less time for writing programs than in Java, for example. A huge base of libraries will save you a lot of strength, nerves and time. Large technology companies are working with Python: Yandex, Google, Facebook and YouTube. It is used for web applications, game development, software for servers.

Java can also be a good choice for a beginner. This language is more popular than Python, but a bit more complicated. At the same time, the development tools are much better designed. Java is one of the most popular languages for the backend development of modern enterprise web applications. It is used in Amazon, eBay, LinkedIn and Yahoo! With Java and the frameworks based on it, developers can create scaling web apps for a wide range of users. Java is also the primary language used for developing Android applications for smart phones and tablets. Moreover, after Java you will be able to work with low level programming languages.

PHP is one more popular language. The PHP language, along with databases (e.g. MySQL) is an important tool for creating modern web applications. Most of the sites developed on PHP are focused on a large amount of data. It is also a fundamental technology of powerful content management systems like WordPress. There are no normal imports in PHP, there are many solutions to one and the same problem. And it makes training more complicated.

 

 
The languages C and C# are a bit complicated for a beginner. But if you develop software for embedded systems, work with system kernels or just want to squeeze out every last drop from all available resources, C is what you need.

Ruby has begun to gain popularity since 2003, when the framework Rails appeared. Used widely among web startups and big companies alike, Ruby and Rails jobs are pretty easy to come by. Ruby and Rails make it easy to transform an idea into a working application, and they have been used to bring us Twitter, GitHub, and Treehouse.

Choosing a programming language may still seem challenging. It shouldn’t. You can’t go wrong. As long as you choose a language that is regularly used in technology today, you’re winning. When you are starting out, the goal is to become solid in the basics, and the basics are pretty similar across almost all modern programming languages.

Part of learning to code is learning a language’s syntax (its grammatical or structural rules). A much bigger part of learning to code, the part that takes longer and gives you more headaches, is learning to solve problems like a programmer. You can learn the grammatical structure of the English language pretty quickly; however, you won’t truly understand the language until you put that grammatical structure to use in a conversation. The same is true in programming. You want to learn the core concepts in order to solve problems. Doing this in one language is similar to doing it in another. Because the core concepts are similar from language to language, I recommend sticking with whichever language you choose until your understanding of the core concepts is solid. If you have a clear idea of your reasons for learning to program, and know exactly what you want to accomplish with your new coding skills, then you’ll be able to make the right choice.

How did you guys get into programming? What are the best programming languages for first-time learners?

Please, share with us your experience and opinion here below:)

 

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Business Development Manager | LI Profile

E-mail:Kate.Kviatkovskaya@altabel.com
Skype: kate.kviatkovskaya
www.altabel.com

Let`s start from a bit of history. React.js is a JavaScript library for building UIs. It was created by Facebook development team to deal with large applications with data that changes over time: react.js hits the “refresh” button any time data changes, and knows to only update the changed parts. Firstly, react was used in-house at Facebook and then it was released as an open-source project and it has quickly gained popularity among developers.

Facebook is not the only one to use React:

Instagram is 100% built on React, both public site and internal tools ;

Yahoo`s mail client is made in React;

Netflix – the biggest paid video-streaming service;

Sberbank, bank #1 in Russia, is built with React;

Khan Academy uses React for most new JS development.

React in comparison to Angular.js isn`t a complete framework. However we can`t say that React.js is only “V” in the MVC. After a closer look, you can actually see that React.js is more than just “V”, it has quite some features of the C (controller) part as well. This is why React is so confusing to understand.

Let`s see why React.js stands out from the crowd:

Convenient architecture

Flux – is highly competitive to MVC. One-way data flow provides maintainability and efficient arrangement of data and DOM elements.

Virtual DOM

React developers suggested using “virtual DOM” in order to solve performance issue for websites with too dynamic DOM. All changes in a document are made there first, and then React looks for the shortest path to apply them in a real DOM tree. This approach makes the framework fast.

Components

React is fundamentally different than other front-end frameworks in that each asset is made up of many isolated components. Want a button changed across the whole platform? Change it once and voilà it`s changed everywhere.

By making the creation, distribution and consumption of isolated reusable components more straightforward, developers are better able to save time by using and creating common abstractions. This is true of both low level elements like buttons and high level elements such as accordions.

JSX

React.js uses a special syntax called JSX, which allows to mix HTML with Javascript. Markup and code are composed in the same file. This means code completion gives you a hand as you type references to your component’s functions and variables.

SEO  friendly

React is significantly more SEO friendly than most JavaScript MVC frameworks. As it is based on a virtual DOM you can use it on the server without needing a headless browser on the server such as Phantom.js to render pages to search engine bots.

React.js is a new interesting emerging Javascript library. It does have some drawbacks however it`s an excellent alternative for building large apps where data changes quickly. We are curious to hear about your experience in using React.jsJ Have you tried it?

 

Anna Kozik

Anna Kozik

Business Development Manager |LI Profile

E-mail:Anna.Kozik@altabel.com 
Skype: kozik_anna
www.altabel.com

jsframework

Whether you’re building apps for the browser, mobile or desktop, Aurelia can enable you to not only create amazing UI, but do it in a way that is maintainable, testable and extensible.

Retrospective and today

Aurelia is a project of Rob Eisenberg, the author of a very popular MV * – framework for Caliburn.Micro XAML-platforms, Durandal. Understanding all the disadvantages of Durandal, Eisenberg engaged in the development of so-called NextGen framework. In 2014 he began to work in Angular team on the second version of the framework. However, several months later, Rob decided to leave the Angular team since the direction of Angular 2, in his opinion, had changed a lot. He gathered a large team and returned to work on the framework of his dreams. And Aurelia is the result of that work.

JavaScript of tomorrow?

By using modern tooling Aurelia was written from the ground up in ECMAScript 2016. This means you have native modules, classes, decorators and more at disposal.
Aurelia is written in modern and future JavaScript, it takes a nowadays approach to architecture. It’s built as a series of collaborating libraries, which form a powerful and robust framework for building Single Page Apps (SPAs). However, Aurelia’s libraries can often be used individually, in traditional web sites or even on the server-side through technologies like NodeJS.
Aurelia’s code is open sourced under the MIT License, a very permissive license used by many popular web projects today. The starter kits are available under the Creative Commons 0 license. There is also a Contributor for those who wish to join the team in working on Aurelia. Ultimately, this means that you can use Aurelia without fear of legal repercussions and it can be build in the same confidence.

Benefits of Aurelia

Clean and Unobtrusive – Aurelia is the only framework that lets you build components with plain JavaScript. It stays out of your way so your code remains clean and easy to evolve over time.

Convention over Configuration – Simple conventions help developers follow solid patterns and reduce the amount of code they have to write and maintain. It also means less fiddling with framework APIs and more focus on their app.

Simple, But Not Simplistic – Because of the simple design developers are able to learn a very small set of patterns and APIs that unlock limitless possibilities.

Promotes the “-ilities” – Testability, maintainability, extensibility, learnability, etc.- Aurelia’s design helps developers to naturally write code that exhibits these desirable characteristics.

Amazingly Extensible – Aurelia is highly modular and designed to be customized easily, so developers will never hit a roadblock or have to “hack” the framework to succeed.

Web Standards Focused – Focused on next generation JavaScript and Web Components, and avoiding unnecessary abstractions that obscure the underlying web, Aurelia is the cleanest and most standards-compliant framework today.

Integrates Well with Others – Easily integrated with any 3rd party library or framework: for instance, with jQuery, React, Polymer, Bootstrap, MaterializeCSS and much more.

TypeScript Support – Each Aurelia library is released with its own d.ts files. There are also official TypeScript beginner kits and production quality starter kits.

An Official Product with Commercial Support – Being an official product of Durandal Inc., it has commercial and enterprise support available, so you can use Aurelia for building core technology for your business.

Thriving Community and Ecosystem – Having one of the largest developer gitter channels in the JavaScript world, oodles of contributors and a huge core team, Aurelia has been used to build just about every type of application and is used by large, well-known multi-national companies and enterprises.
 
Aurelia, Angular and React.js – what’s common and what’s different?
 

Aurelia vs. Angular

Similarities between Aurelia and Angular 2:

  • Aurelia offers ES6-support out of the box and supports all forms of alternative abstraction syntax such as TypeScript and CoffeeScript. Migration documentation about migrating from Angular 1 and 2 have been put on the roadmap.
  • The basis of both Angular 2 and Aurelia application comprise components associated with the corresponding template.
  • Differences in vision details and options range:

  • The syntax is much simpler and more explicit (i.e. self-explanatory) than Angular 2 and looks a lot like standard JS syntax. ES6 and JSPM are used by default and a gulp file with a custom-built system to transpile ES6 to ES5 using the Babel transpiler is included in the standard package.
  • Aurelia also uses conventions instead of its own syntax and boilerplate code. No special characters like the ones in Angular 2 (*, (), [] en #) here.
  • Aurelia is built in a modular way making it very pluggable. You can plug in internationalization, routing, virtualization, animation, … Besides that, third party plugins are available as well such as the aurelia-flux plugin adding the Flux dispatcher to Aurelia.
  • The presence of a root-component is necessary; it represents an application (app). The metadata may / should be attached to components by using decorators. Component initialization is performed by using dependency injection. In addition, each component has a declared lifecycle, which can be built by using the lifecycle hooks. The components may be formulated into a hierarchical structure.
  • Communication between the component and the template is performed by using data binding. The process of template rendering to the final HTML can be integrated by using pipes (Angular) or value converters + binding behaviours (Aurelia).
  • The main advantage of Aurelia in comparison to Angular is an advanced composition mechanism and template parts. Aurelia is designed with an emphasis on unobtrusive, the number of framework structures in the final code is minimal. Aurelia is more compact, while Angular sometimes simply forces to produce copy-paste.
  • Aurelia is new to the market while Angular has a big user base because it’s already been around for 6 years. On the other hand, Aurelia has great documentation available, it’s an official product of Durandal Inc, and the company has a long term vision for the product, something the Angular team doesn’t seem to have and is blamed for a lot.

Aurelia vs. React.js

  • While on the surface it might not seem fair to compare Aurelia to React.js, they’re both being used for the same things. Despite the fact that React.js is a fully-fledged and functionally released product without the early preview alpha tag and Aurelia is not, at current stage they are both pretty at the same level. You can achieve the same tasks within both, just in different ways.
  • As for React components and Aurelia’s ViewModel’s, they are both quite similar in that you’re essentially using a class to define properties and methods bound to a particular view. The primary difference between them is React doesn’t separate the logic from the view, meaning in React the View and ViewModel are both within the same file.
  • However, that’s not to say that Aurelia doesn’t allow you to achieve the same thing by rendering the View from within the ViewModel as well and forgoing a traditional View.
  • The original intent behind React.js was not to be a competitor to the likes of Angular or Aurelia, but rather be the library that everyone uses with their SPA framework like Angular to improve performance.
  • Therefore, this means you can easily use React.js within Aurelia. Aurelia and React.js can be used together and in doing so, it provides you with a level of power other frameworks cannot without subsequent complexity and strict convention like EmberJS.

Aurelia vs. Angular and React

  • Two-way binding is provided out of the box and the framework does so very precisely. By default, 1-way databinding is used except for form controls, a clear plus when compared to React. Do keep in mind that two-way data binding can only be done through explicit syntax, as is the case in Angular 2.
  • The learning curve for Aurelia is comparable to that of Angular 2 and thus a lot steeper than React’s. Luckily, the extensive documentation makes up for that a great deal.
  • Angular 2 and Aurelia Architecture is very similar. Aurelia looks a lot like Angular 2 in the sense that it’s a complete framework that relies on the web standards. It’s as pluggable as React is and as Angular 2 will be.
  • While Angular was created by Google and React by Facebook, they don’t provide commercial or enterprise support, something that Aurelia will do.

 
Conclusion

It goes without saying why these three frameworks are so popular. They all have a lot of strong advantages. Eventually, I’m favoring Aurelia: there’s solid documentation available and the overall philosophy is the same with Angular 2, but Aurelia is a better choice from the syntax and execution point of view. The architecture and syntax vision of Aurelia team seems to be more clear than the vision of the Angular team. The company and enterprise support of Aurelia is also a big pro.
What is your personal experience with these frameworks? Which one would you choose for your projects and why? What’s your prediction “who” will win the crown in the nearest future? Please feel free to share your thoughts with us.

Thank you in advance!

 

Darya

Darya Bertosh
darya.bertosh@altabel.com
Skype ID: darya.bertosh
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

Java brings a lot of popular and user-friendly frameworks, content management systems and servers that help to simplify the application development process, website management process and much more irrespective of the size and complexity of the project. When it comes to CMS, Java possesses a host of CMSs that have been highly recognized in the market, but one CMS that has gained great popularity and attention from the developers and companies across the world is Magnolia.

Magnolia is an open source content management system which delivers exceptional simplicity on an enterprise level, combining user-friendly usage with a standards-based and flexible Java architecture. Companies such as Airbus Group, Al Arabiya, Avis and Virgin America use it as the central hub for their web, mobile and IoT initiatives. Founded in 1997, Magnolia is a privately-held company headquartered in Basel, Switzerland. The company has offices around the globe, and customers in over 100 countries.

Making a good CMS to cater the needs of the clients is never an easy task, and the developers Magnolia knows this thing better. Hence, Magnolia brings some of the much needed features and functionalities for the enterprises.

• Magnolia comes with a smart cache, a built-in clustering capabiliy and distributed deployment architecture that easily decouples authoring from publishing and the possibility to develop load-balanced public servers to bring more throughput and availability.
• It also offer code highlighting for the designers & developers, easy integration of 3rd party frameworks, extendable workflow, J2EE compliance, RSS generation & aggregation and more for the customization.
• When it comes to designing, it brings standard-based templating in JSP and servlets, unlimited page and component design, Freemarker as a template engine, custom tag library to speed up templating and pluggable templating engine for the designers.
• It brings Open APIs, advanced caching strategies, unlimited scalability, clustering & load balancing, transactional activation and tons of other performance related features & functionalities for the enterprises.
• From the security point of view, Magnolia brings flexible user permissions using role-based user management and distributed architecture, which is a need of today’s enterprises.
• It also enables team work through concurrent editing, deletion, address book, workgroup collaboration and some other features.
Apart from all these, Magnolia also enables search engine optimization, content tagging, configurable workflow, content versioning, social media integration, multilingual support, multi-site management, mobile publishing and tons of other enterprise-scale functionalities.

magnolia

However, like any other technology or platform, Magnolia also has some advantages and disadvantages. Let’s take a look at each of them:

The Pros
• It’s an open source.
• User friendly, easy to use for Administrators/Content Editors/Authors
• Good set of standard components in the standard templating kit (STK)
• Very flexible, almost anything can be customized
• Vast set of open modules for many additional features
• Leverage from page-based site or navigation.
• It utilizes installer, but the WAR files can be used to redeploy it to some other place.

The Cons
• Steep learning curve
• Inconsistent or lack of documentation
• Configuration via JCR-Tree can be error-prone and not very transparent
• Versions -4.5, 4.5+ and 5 all have shifts in paradigms
• Versioning and collaboration

All in all, Magnolia is a very promising CMS that integrates well into an enterprise java stack. It is predominantly suited for medium to large businesses where processes need deep integration and customizations. With regards to small businesses, Magnolia might be somewhat of an overkill.

How about you? Did you have a chance to work with Magnolia CMS? What is your attitude to it?

Please feel free to share with us your thoughts and experience here below.

 

Katerina Kviatkovskaya

Katerina Kviatkovskaya
Kate.Kviatkovskaya@altabel.com
Skype ID: kate.kviatkovskaya
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

js

JavaScript is celebrating 20th anniversary in 2015. It’s a language with a changeable history and carries a lot of baggage from its childhood, but as it leaves its teenage years behind it, now it’s a language that has finally grown up. JavaScript made a revolution in web by allowing scripts to run in a browser. But after its initial popularity soon the reputation was spoiled and JS was often associated with poorly written, cut-and-pasted code that was used to create annoying pop-ups and cheesy ‘effects’. Thus we see that JavaScript had some annoying weaknesses as a programming language.

On the other hand, we can observe that JavaScript has “ubiquity” that other programming languages don’t have. One must admit that you just need a browser to run, which means that anyone with a smartphone or computer is capable of running a JavaScript application. JavaScript has made the dream true that Java was available on all platforms by using the browser as its virtual machine. And now thanks to Node.js, it can run without a browser.

It is well known fact that simple text editor – is all you need to write a program in JS. JavaScript has a low barrier to entry when it comes to development. And we also must agree with GitHub that JavaScript is one of the most popular languages. This means that help is often easy to come by and there is a lot of JavaScript code out there. Furthermore, one should not forget that it also means that code’ libraries are well tested and many issues have already been solved.

After a first decade, which was a period of awkward childhood, JavaScript was growing up like most of the teenagers. People changed their mind with the revolutionary advent of Ajax. jQuery then made people using JavaScript to build some new applications and Node has taken it all to a whole serious level. JavaScript established itself as a powerful and flexible language with some cool features such as:
– Prototype-based Inheritance
– Closures
– JSON (subset of the object literal notation of JavaScript)
– Asynchronous event-driven programming
– Functions as objects

Frameworks and Libraries

Lots of frameworks and libraries have been written to mitigate problems and improve JavaScript for programming. JavaScript framework is the set of pre-written JavaScript code that helps to ease development of the JS based applications. This framework is also known as JavaScript libraries, which enhance the use of this programming language in many ways.
We have already shared some posts about the JavaScript frameworks in the past. JavaScript framework can be found anywhere on the web with different type of working capabilities. We have selected few of them to keep an eye on, and we hope you will find our compilation useful.

1) Angular.js

Open-source web application framework. It aims to simplify both the development and the testing of such applications by providing a framework for client-sidemodel–view–controller (MVC) and model–view–viewmodel (MVVM) architectures, along with components commonly used in rich Internet applications.

2) Ember.js

Open-source JavaScript application framework, based on the model-view-controller (MVC) pattern. It allows developers to create scalable single-page web applications by incorporating common idioms and best practices into the framework.

3) Meteor (MeteorJS)

Open-source JavaScript web application framework written using Node.js. Meteor allows for rapid prototyping and produces cross-platform (web, Android, iOS) code. It integrates with MongoDB and uses the Distributed Data Protocol and a publish–subscribe pattern to automatically propagate data changes to clients without requiring the developer to write any synchronization code. On the client, Meteor depends on jQuery and can be used with any JavaScript UI widget library.

4) Backbone.js

JavaScript library with a RESTful JSON interface and is based on the model–view–presenter (MVP) application design paradigm. Backbone is known for being lightweight, as its only dependency is on one JavaScript library, Underscore.js. It is designed for developing single-page web applications, and for keeping various parts of web applications (e.g. multiple clients and the server) synchronized. Backbone was created by Jeremy Ashkenas, who is also known for CoffeeScript.

5) Knockout.js

JavaScript implementation of the Model-View-ViewModel pattern with templates. Main principles are: a clear separation between domain data, view components and data to be displayed; the presence of a clearly defined layer of specialized code to manage the relationships between the view components. These features streamline and simplify the specification of complex relationships between view components, which in turn make the display more responsive and the user experience richer.

6) Ext JS (Sencha Ext JS)

JavaScript application for building interactive cross platform web applications using techniques such as Ajax, DHTML and DOM scripting. Ext JS includes interoperability with jQuery andPrototype.

7) D3.js (D3)

JavaScript library for producing dynamic, interactive data visualizations in web browsers. It makes use of the widely implemented SVG, HTML5, and CSS standards. It is the successor to the earlier Protovis framework. In contrast to many other libraries, D3.js allows great control over the final visual result.

Conclusion

JavaScript will be one of the most important languages to learn and invest into over the next few years. Website development is into a single-page web application that relies on JavaScript to do the heavy lifting on the client side (in this case, usually JS goes with modern front-end frameworks such as Backbone or Angular.js). The advantage of using Isomorphic JavaScript is increasing the popularity of JS. The data that is transported from databases is often stored in JSON format. The possibility of using a combination of HTML, CSS and JavaScript let you build an application for iOS, Android and FireFox OS. JavaScript has existing libraries, plugins, APIs and other cool stuff to be broad used in The Internet of Things (IoT). JavaScript is becoming the language not just for the front and back end of web development, but also for interacting with a huge number of modern devices.

To sum up, I must admit that now is the perfect time to get started with JavaScript projects, as it moves into its 20s, and has finally grown up for starting to go places!
What are your opinions about JavaScript future, its libraries and frameworks? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments.

 

11d78a3

Svetlana Pozdnyakova
svetlana.pozdnyakova@altabel.com 
Skype ID: Svetlana.pozdnyakova
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

 

In the history of computing first Java appeared, then close on its heels came JavaScript. The names made them seem like conjoined twins newly detached, but they couldn’t be more different. One of them compiled and statically typed; the other interpreted and dynamically typed. That’s only the beginning of the technical differences between these two wildly distinct languages that have since shifted onto a collision course of sorts, thanks to Node.js.

If you’re old enough to have been around back then, you might remember Java’s early, epic peak. It left the labs, and its hype meter pinned. Everyone saw it as a revolution that would stop at nothing less than a total takeover of computing. That prediction ended up being only partially correct. Today, Java dominates Android phones, enterprise computing, and some embedded worlds like Blu-ray disks.

For all its success, though, Java never established much traction on the desktop or in the browser. People touted the power of applets and Java-based tools, but gunk always glitches up these combinations. Servers became Java’s sweet spot.

Meanwhile, what programmers initially mistook as the dumb twin has come into its own. Sure, JavaScript tagged along for a few years as HTML and the Web pulled a Borg on the world. But that changed with AJAX. Suddenly, the dumb twin had power.

Then Node.js was spawned, turning developers’ heads with its speed. Not only was JavaScript faster on the server than anyone had expected, but it was often faster than Java and other options. Its steady diet of small, quick, endless requests for data have since made Node.js more common, as Web pages have grown more dynamic.

While it may have been unthinkable 20 years ago, the quasi-twins are now locked in a battle for control of the programming world. On one side are the deep foundations of solid engineering and architecture. On the other side are simplicity and ubiquity. Will the old-school compiler-driven world of Java hold its ground, or will the speed and flexibility of Node.js help JavaScript continue to gobble up everything in its path?

Where Java wins:

1. Rock-solid foundation

I can hear the developers laughing. Some may even be dying of heart failure. Yes, Java has glitches and bugs, but relatively speaking, it’s the Rock of Gibraltar. The same faith in Node.js is many years off. In fact, it may be decades before the JavaScript crew writes nearly as many regression tests as Sun/Oracle developed to test the Java Virtual Machine. When you boot up a JVM, you get 20 years of experience from a solid curator determined to dominate the enterprise server. When you start up JavaScript, you get the work of an often cantankerous coalition that sometimes wants to collaborate and sometimes wants to use the JavaScript standard to launch passive-aggressive attacks.

2. Better IDEs

Java developers have Eclipse, NetBeans, or IntelliJ, three top-notch tools that are well-integrated with debuggers, decompilers, and servers. Each has years of development, dedicated users, and solid ecosystems filled with plug-ins.

Meanwhile, most Node.js developers type words into the command line and code into their favorite text editor. Some use Eclipse or Visual Studio, both of which support Node.js. Of course, the surge of interest in Node.js means new tools are arriving, some of which, offer intriguing approaches, but they’re still a long way from being as complete as Eclipse.

Of course, if you’re looking for an IDE that edits and juggles tools, the new tools that support Node.js are good enough. But if you ask your IDE to let you edit while you operate on the running source code like a heart surgeon slices open a chest, well, Java tools are much more powerful. It’s all there, and it’s all local.

3. Remote debugging

Java boasts incredible tools for monitoring clusters of machines. There are deep hooks into the JVM and elaborate profiling tools to help identify bottlenecks and failures. The Java enterprise stack runs some of the most sophisticated servers on the planet, and the companies that use those servers have demanded the very best in telemetry. All of these monitoring and debugging tools are quite mature and ready for you to deploy.

4. Libraries

There is a huge collection of libraries available in Java, and they offer some of the most serious work around. Text indexing tools like Lucene and computer vision toolkits like OpenCV are two examples of great open source projects that are ready to be the foundation of a serious project. There are plenty of libraries written in JavaScript and some of them are amazing, but the depth and quality of the Java code base is superior.

5. Threads

Fast code is great, but it’s usually more important that it be correct. Here is where Java’s extra features make sense.

Java’s Web servers are multithreaded. Creating multiple threads may take time and memory, but it pays off. If one thread deadlocks, the others continue. If one thread requires longer computation, the other threads aren’t starved for attention (usually).

If one Node.js request runs too slowly, everything slows down. There’s only one thread in Node.js, and it will get to your event when it’s good and ready. It may look superfast, but underneath it uses the same architecture as a one-window post office in the week before Christmas.

There have been decades of work devoted to building smart operating systems that can juggle many different processes at the same time. Why go back in time to the ’60s when computers could handle only one thread?

Where Node wins:

1. Ubiquity

Thanks to Node.js, JavaScript finds a home on the server and in the browser. Code you write for one will more than likely run the same way on both. Nothing is guaranteed in life, but this is as close as it gets in the computer business. It’s much easier to stick with JavaScript for both sides of the client/server divide than it is to write something once in Java and again in JavaScript, which you would likely need to do if you decided to move business logic you wrote in Java for the server to the browser. Or maybe the boss will insist that the logic you built for the browser be moved to the server. In either direction, Node.js and JavaScript make it much easier to migrate code.

2. Build process simplified by using same language

Complicated build tools like Ant and Maven have revolutionized Java programming. But there’s only one issue. You write the specification in XML, a data format that wasn’t designed to support programming logic. Sure, it’s relatively easy to express branching with nested tags, but there’s still something annoying about switching gears from Java to XML merely to build something.

3. Database queries

Queries for some of the newer databases, like CouchDB, are written in JavaScript. Mixing Node.js and CouchDB requires no gear-shifting, let alone any need to remember syntax differences.
Meanwhile, many Java developers use SQL. Even when they use the Java DB (formerly Derby), a database written in Java for Java developers, they write their queries in SQL. You would think they would simply call Java methods, but you’d be wrong. You have to write your database code in SQL, then let Derby parse the SQL. It’s a nice language, but it’s completely different and many development teams need different people to write SQL and Java.

4. JSON

When databases spit out answers, Java goes to elaborate lengths to turn the results into Java objects. Developers will argue for hours about POJO mappings, Hibernate, and other tools. Configuring them can take hours or even days. Eventually, the Java code gets Java objects after all of the conversion.
Many Web services and databases return data in JSON, a natural part of JavaScript. The format is now so common and useful that many Java developers use the JSON formats, so a number of good JSON parsers are available as Java libraries as well. But JSON is part of the foundation of JavaScript. You don’t need libraries. It’s all there and ready to go.

5. Speed

People love to praise the speed of Node.js. The data comes in and the answers come out like lightning. Node.js doesn’t mess around with setting up separate threads with all of the locking headaches. There’s no overhead to slow down anything. You write simple code and Node.js takes the right step as quickly as possible.

This praise comes with a caveat. Your Node.js code better be simple and it better work correctly. If it deadlocks, the entire server could lock up. Operating system developers have pulled their hair out creating safety nets that can withstand programming mistakes, but Node.js throws away these nets.

Where both win: Cross-compiling from one to the other

The debate whether to use Java or Node.js on your servers can and will go on for years. As opposed to most debates, however, we can have it both ways. Java can be cross-compiled into JavaScript. Google does this frequently with Google Web Toolkit, and some of its most popular websites have Java code running in them — Java that was translated into JavaScript.

What is your opinion on what to choose Java or Node.js?

Polina Mikhan

Polina Mikhan
Polina.Mikhan@altabel.com 
Skype ID: poly1020
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development


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