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Archive for the ‘Java’ Category

Internet of Things(IoT) is extremely broad phrase, and can mean a great many different things. But it does not change the fact that each day more and more devices all over the world are being connected to the Internet. At that rate, Internet of Things (IoT) development projects are gaining popularity to say the least.

It is definitely the trend. This brings up a question: what programming languages are the most popular for IoT project? Well, according to the Eclipse Foundation survey, Java, JavaScript, C, and Python are the top four programming choices for developers who are building IoT solutions. Let’s look into them!


Though some people question the use of Java in IoT it is not surprising to see Java as being the most popular among developers who are working on IoT solutions. The practicality of the statement “write once, run anywhere” still predetermines the choice in a great measure.

Java advantages are apparent. It is an object-oriented and platform independent language. Thus coding and debugging can be done on desktop and moved to any chip with a Java Virtual Machine afterwards. Therefore code can be run not only on places where JVMs are common (servers and smartphones), but also on the smallest machines. Minimum hardware dependency is a huge plus. This also means that Java is great from an economic standpoint: devotion to Java coding can pay back across various platforms.

Besides, by now Java has attracted an active community of millions software developers and is being taught as one of the primary programming languages in the majority of engineering degree programs. Consequently, finding someone skilled in Java programming should not constitute a problem.

Last but not the least, maturity and stability of this language make it even more attractive. When there are devices that are going to be remotely managed and provisioned for a long period of time, Java’s stability and care about backwards compatibility become important.

It should be taken into consideration thought that your choice of IoT platform should support Java. You should make sure available hardware support libraries should have control functions according to your requirements too.


Combining some knowledge from other languages JavaScript has not only proven itself worthy on both the client and server side of the web, but it also has a huge potential in the growing Internet of Things domain.

The main difference between Javascript and Java is that JavaScript is a scripting language that has a range of existing libraries, plugins, and APIs, and many of them can be used to create complicated IoT apps easier and faster. Instead of building a range of new libraries and plugins, developers are free to reuse and further develop existing solutions around the web for absolutely new implementations.

Remarkably, applications that listen for events and respond when events occur are a strength of a JavaScript. Effective and secure communications and interactivity are of paramount importance in the IoT, and there are great systems for dealing with requests and events. For example, maintains an open connection between the server and the browser and thus enables the server to push updates to the browser as they happen. This gives you a chance to see the changes in the IoT network without a page refresh. By providing real time event based communication across multiple devices really comes in handy.

Additionally, much of the Internet is built on JavaScript and huge portion of the web functionality is enabled through JavaScript. Connecting up the web to our IoT devices and using the language that web pages and web apps already speak lead to simplicity in management.

It’s important to mention however, that Javascript would be a bad choice for lightweight embedded controllers.


Created to program the telephone switches C programming language has almost monopolized embedded systems programming. Its proximity to machine language makes it impressively fast.

C can create compact and faster runtime code. Still it should be noted that runtime speed isn’t the primary aspect of development to consider. Development speed should also be takes into account (and other languages may be much more efficient in that).

Another vote for stems from the fact that majority of the modern languages follow the syntax of C, which means that it is easy to learn and effective in accomplishing advanced tasks.

As both completing complex tasks and finding developers with extensive experience in C is relatively easy, its applicability to IoT projects speaks for itself.

Still, there are some drawbacks of C that make it less preferred in today’s development world, e.g. poor data security and no run time checking mechanism.


Although Python originally is widely chosen for Web development, it has significantly gained popularity in the IoT coding arena for the past few years. Such huge advantages as its flexibility, writability, error reduction, and readability contributed to that greatly. Distribution of compact executable code is easy. Working in programming teams is easy. Known as organized and neat, its elegant syntax is great for database arrangement. Sure, Python is a good choice for building applications that take data, convert it into any sort of a database format and draw upon the tables for control information. Python also has libraries for all 3 main IoT protocols such as TCP/IP, Bluetooth and NFC.

Additionally, IoT projects involve lots of data analytics and Python has rich modules for that.

Finally, major IoT hardware platforms and micro-controllers, e.g. Arduino, Raspberry PI, Intel Galileo, are enabled for interactive communication through Python.

Probably, the main problem for Python is its runtime speed, especially in comparison to C. Still there is a number of ways to optimize the code so it runs more efficiently.

Steady increase in popularity of Python for IoT is evident.

So which programming language is the best for IoT?

No definite answer, guys… All the above languages influence the IoT space up to an extent. However, the preference of language today depends on the end use of the app, product or service you want to create. What do you think? I’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments!



Alexandra Presniatsova

Business Development Manager

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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


We see this “Is Java out of business?” question pop up year after year. They say that Java is the least feature-rich language of the popular languages on the JVM and the slowest to move on new features in the last decade. There are also people who believe that because so many new JVM languages are being invented is proof that the Java language is lacking and that Java is no longer meeting the needs of many developers. And yet, by all external markers, Java is alive, well, and growing.

Here are several proofs for it:

1. TIOBE ranked Java as its top language of 2015 currently shows it enjoying 5% growth in use since 2014, more than any other programming language.

2. RedMonk has recently published the latest edition of its bi-annual list of the top programming languages. Compiled with the help of data obtained from GitHub and StackOverflow, this list tells us about the usage and discussion of a language on the web. Just like the previous years Java is among the top of the programming languages.

3. Further, the PYPL Index, which ranks languages based on how often language tutorials are searched on Google, shows Java clearly out in front with 23.9% of the total search volume.

Since Java first appeared it has gained enormous popularity. Its rapid ascension and wide acceptance can be traced to its design and programming features, particularly in its promise that you can write a program once, and run it anywhere. Java was chosen as the programming language for network computers (NC) and has been perceived as a universal front end for the enterprise database. As stated in Java language white paper by Sun Microsystems: “Java is a simple, object-oriented, distributed, interpreted, robust, secure, architecture neutral, portable, multithreaded, and dynamic.”

So here are the most common and significant advantages of Java that helped it to take its high position in a quite competitive environment of programming languages:

  • Java is easy to learn.
    Java was designed to be easy to use and is therefore easy to write, compile, debug, and learn than other programming languages.
  • Java is platform-independent.
    One of the most significant advantages of Java is its ability to move easily from one computer system to another. The ability to run the same program on many different systems is crucial to World Wide Web software, and Java succeeds at this by being platform-independent at both the source and binary levels.
  • Java is secure.
    Java considers security as part of its design. The Java language, compiler, interpreter, and runtime environment were each developed with security in mind.
  • Java is robust.
    Robust means reliability. Java puts a lot of emphasis on early checking for possible errors, as Java compilers are able to detect many problems that would first show up during execution time in other languages.
  • Java is multithreaded.
    Multithreaded is the capability for a program to perform several tasks simultaneously within a program. In Java, multithreaded programming has been smoothly integrated into it, while in other languages, operating system-specific procedures have to be called in order to enable multithreading.

Nonetheless things changed since the time when Java was created. In the recent years, many important languages have appeared and left an impact on the technology world. Due to their simplicity and user-friendliness, they have managed to surpass the more established languages. So we tried to make a list of reasons why Java is going to stay on the grind in the nearest future:

1. Java is time-proved.
You generally need a strong reason to switch from a language you’re currently using: it requires time to practice and learn new languages, and you have to be confident that the language you’re considering switching to will be supported in the long term. Nobody wants to build software in a language that will be obsolete in five years’ time.

2. JVM and the Java Ecosystem.
The Java Virtual Machine, or JVM. compiles programs into bytecode, which is then interpreted and run by the JVM. Because the JVM sits above your specific hardware and OS, it allows Java to be run on anything, a Windows machine, a Mac, or an obscure some flavor of Linux.

The big advantage granted by the JVM is in this increased compatibility and the stability it affords. Because your application runs in the VM instead of directly on your hardware, you can program said application once and trust that it is executable on every device with a Java VM implementation. This principle is the basis for Java’s core messaging: “Write once, run everywhere.” And it makes Java applications very resilient to underlying changes in the environment.

3. Java and the Internet of Things.
“I really think Java’s future is in IoT. I’d like to see Oracle and partners focused on a complete end-to-end storage solution for Java, from devices through gateways to enterprise back-ends. Building that story and making a success of it will help cement the next 20 years for Java. Not only is that a massive opportunity for the industry, but also one I think Java can do quite well,” said Mike Milinkovich, Executive Director of the Eclipse Foundation.

Oracle agrees. Per VP of Development Georges Saab, “Java is an excellent tech for IoT. Many of the challenges in IoT are many of the challenges of desktop and client Java helped address in the 1990s. You have many different hardware environments out there. You want to have your developers look at any part of the system, understand it and move on. Java is one of the few technologies out there that lets you do that.”
Thus, Java might have its detractors, and some of their arguments might even be reasonable. Nonetheless Java has evolved a lot since its inception, holds the lead in many areas of software development and has more prospects for the future. So, in our opinion, its survivability is not in doubt.

And what do you think? Is Java going to become one of the dead languages? Or it has all chances to survive? Feel free to share your thoughts in comments below!



Yana Khaidukova

Business Development Manager

Skype: yana_altabel
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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


With the coming of Node.js, JavaScript has taken the lead. It is no longer limited to front-end development, and back-end development is no longer super complex for front-end coders. It became a popular and a well-known programming language used by developers in browsers.

Today, Node.js offers one of the most innovative solutions to building servers and web/mobile applications. Its single-threaded event looping and asynchronous, non-blocking input/output processing feature distinguishes it from other runtime environments. Its scope is increasing fast with valuable contributions from developers’ community and other technology giants. Right now, several performance-driven frameworks are being developed using primary principles and approaches of Node.js. These frameworks have extended the functionality of Node.js to a great extent and have also built newer features.

In this article let’s have a look at the frameworks associated with Node.js so that you can choose the one you like.


Express is a minimal and flexible Node.js web application framework that provides a robust set of features for web and mobile applications. With a myriad of HTTP utility methods and middleware at your disposal, creating a robust API is quick and easy. Express provides a thin layer of fundamental web application features, without obscuring Node.js features that you know and love. Many popular frameworks are based on Express.


Sails is the most popular MVC framework for Node.js. Sails makes it easy to build custom, enterprise-grade Node.js apps. It is designed to emulate the familiar MVC pattern of frameworks like Ruby on Rails, but with support for the requirements of modern apps: data-driven APIs with a scalable, service-oriented architecture. It’s especially good for building chat, real-time dashboards, or multiplayer games; but you can use it for any web application project – top to bottom.


Hapi.js is a powerful Node.js web framework for building APIs and other software applications. The framework has a robust plugin system and numerous key features, including input validation, configuration-based functionality, implement caching, error handling, logging and more. Hapi.js is used for designing useful applications, such as Postmile, a collaborative list making tool. Besides, it is used for providing technology solutions by several large-scale websites, such as Disney, Concrete, PayPal, Walmart and more.


Koa is a new web framework designed by the team behind Express, which aims to be a smaller, more expressive, and more robust foundation for web applications and APIs. Through leveraging generators Koa allows you to ditch callbacks and greatly increase error-handling. Koa does not bundle any middleware within core, and provides an elegant suite of methods that make writing servers fast and enjoyable.


Meteor.js is a real-time application designed to build Web apps that constantly synchronize with the server. Your changes to templates and data flow from the server to the browser automatically. The redrawing and the updating are handled directly by the underlying framework. This works, by the way, in both directions. Your browser code can make changes or write data as if the database is right there. The synchronization happens in the background.


Derby.js is a full-stack MVC framework built for establishing a more solid routine towards creating modern web applications without the need to write complicated code. With Derby you can easily build real-time applications that will run simultaneously in the Node.js server and the browser. The Racer Engine that Derby enables for developers to use is a powerful way of synchronizing your browser, server and database data in real-time amongst all three mediums, enabling you and your app users to experience a true real-time experience. Racer supports offline usage and conflict resolution out of the box, which greatly simplifies writing multi-user applications.


Total.js is one of the modern and modular Node.js frameworks supporting model-view controller (MVC) software architecture. It is fully compatible with various client-side frameworks, like Angular.js, Polymer, Backbone.js, Bootstrap and more. Total.js is fully extensible and asynchronous. One great feature of Total.js is that you don’t need any tools like Grunt to compress JavaScript, HTML and CSS. Additionally, the framework has NoSQL embedded database and supports array and other prototypes. It supports RESTful routing mechanism, supports web sockets, media streaming and more.


Not every application requires full support for a browser. Restify is one of the server-side frameworks designed to serve up data and only data through an API. You fire it up and out comes JSON to everyone who shows up.
Restify places special emphasis on debugging and profiling so that you can drill down and optimize the performance of your server. DTrace is well-integrated and supported to make it possible to watch what happens and when it might go wrong. Restify is available from GitHub under a very basic license that requires little except a notice of copyright.

Web and apps development landscape is changing very fast and developers are shifting to frameworks aiming at quick and clean project delivery. The biggest plus of using node frameworks is that they provide high level readymade structure and you can focus on scaling your application instead of spending efforts in building and defining the basics.

Let us know your experience with Node.js frameworks via comments. Perhaps there are any «new comers» that deserve our attention?


Yuliya Tolkach

Yuliya Tolkach

Business Development Manager

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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


JavaScript is the most accessible cross-platform language nowadays. It’s used both on front-end and back-end website development.

Using it Altabel developers create web-apps which includes offline mode, desktop apps, apps for smartphones and tablets, add-ins for Microsoft Office, SharePoint and Dynamics. And if you don’t get acquainted with JavaScript yet we strongly believe that you should do it immediately!

I reckon many of us know there are plenty of different languages compiled in JavaScript. It’s CoffeeScript, Dart, GorillaScript and others. To be fair some of these languages are fly-by-night creations that have never really taken off in the wild. But many of these languages are major engineering efforts with large ecosystems and large corporate backers. With so many frameworks and languages out there it can be difficult to figure out which one is the best.

In 2012 Microsoft analyzed the situation and created a new language with a possibility of dealing with problems and using existing JavaScript insights. Thus, a free open source programming language TypeScript was developed and maintained by Anders Hejlsberg (co-creator of Turbo Pascal, Delphi and C#). From the very beginning the new language started expanding rather quickly due to its flexibility and productivity. Considerable amount of projects written in JavaScript began to transfer to TypeScript. Popularity and relevancy of the new language leaded to the fact that lots of TypeScript ideas became the part of new JavaScripts standard afterwards. And moving forward the AngularJS 2.0 version (today one of the most popular web frameworks) was completely written on TypeScript with the help of Microsoft and Google.

But why TypeScript?

Let’s review main reasons of its popularity:

  • TypeScript is a typed superset of JavaScript. In other words any valid JavaScript code is also valid for TypeScript.
  • TypeScript may be used to develop JavaScript applications for client-side or server-side execution.

Microsoft’s TypeScript seems to generate the most attractive code and is considered to be one of the best JavaScript front-ends. TypeScript adds sweetness, but at a price.

  • TypeScript can also be used with existing JavaScript frameworks/libraries such as Angular, jQuery, and others and can even catch type issues and provide enhanced code help as you build your apps.
  • TypeScript can be just the right fit for projects in which developers try to remain relevant without the need to learn a whole new syntax.

The ubiquity of JavaScript as a runtime has inspired people from a variety of programming backgrounds to recreate JavaScript as they see fit. And yes, TypeScript lets you write JavaScript the way you really want to.

  • TypeScript differs from JavaScript with possibility of evident static objectives, with usage maintenance of full-blown classes (just as in traditional object-oriented languages), and also with maintenance of logging on modules. It’s aimed at development speed raising, simplifying of legibility, refactoring and reusability of your code.
  • TypeScript has many additional language features but defining types and creating classes, modules, and interfaces are some of the key features it offers.
  • In TypeScript the same types are supported as well you would expect it in JavaScript. Types enable TypeScript developers to use highly-productive development tools and practices: static checking, symbol-based navigation, statement completion and code refactoring.
  • TypeScript implements many conceptions that are appropriate to object-oriented languages such as extending, polymorphism, encapsulation, accessibility modifiers and so on.
  • Lots of TypeScript features have strict rules, so various code formatting errors are excluded. Which means that the possibility of incorrect implementation or inaccurate method invocations is eliminated.
  • TypeScript potentially allows writing large complex programs more quickly. Thereafter it’s easier to maintain, develop, adjust to scale and test them in comparison with standard JavaScript.


TypeScript has a number of other positive features that are out of the scope of this article. On the other hand, there are two significant minuses exist.

  • Probably, the biggest minus is entry threshold and number of specialists on the market. Nowadays there are not so many specialists with solid experience in this language.
  • In comparison with JavaScript, it’s needed more time for the development. It stems from the fact that apart from class implementation one should describe all enabled interfaces and method signatures.

TypeScript 2.0

There are some significant changes coming in TypeScript 2.0 that continue to deliver on the promise of making JavaScript scale. This includes a whole rewrite of the way types are analysed in the flow of the code and an opt-in feature that starts to deal with logic errors around the flexibility of things being undefined or null in JavaScript. Other features planned for TypeScript 2.0 include read-only properties and async/await downlevel support.

TypeScript creator Anders Hejlsberg already has plans for TypeScript 2.1 and beyond. Features envisioned for these releases include a new JavaScript language service in Microsoft’s Visual Studio software development platform and more refactoring support.

The most recent version, TypeScript 1.8, rolled out in February, includes several more features like F-Bounded polymorphism, string literal types, etc.


So, if you haven’t taken a look at TypeScript, I have hopefully convinced you that it is something to at least worth a bit of your time. It has some of the best minds focused on making JavaScript scale and the team is going about it in a way that is open and transparent. By embracing the reality of JavaScript and building on top of it, in my opinion TypeScript is transforming the common language of the web, for the better.

We will be happy to hear how you use TypeScript in your current projects, if you like it, if you are planning to switch to this language, what are the pros and cons in your opinion, etc. Feel free to share with your thoughts in comments below!


Victoria Sazonchik

Victoria Sazonchik

Business Development Manager

Skype: victoria_sazonchik
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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development



“Computer programming is an art, because it applies accumulated knowledge to the world, because it requires skill and ingenuity, and especially because it produces objects of beauty.”
Donald Knuth, 1974


It’s better to start your journey into the career of programming by answering the question “Do you really need programming?” This question does not apply to those, who majored in computer programming or was close to it. If at school you were good at math, if you like to spend a lot of time sitting in front of the computer, if you want to learn something new, then programming is for you. What is more, this area is now in demand and highly paid in the world, job vacancies for the post of programmers are always open. Isn’t it the best time to be a programmer?🙂

Everyone knows that the future programmer should be able to think broadly and to present the project from different perspectives before its implementation and realization. Unfortunately, the machine does not understand a human language. Of course, I’m not talking about Siri and other voice recognition — I’m talking about the creation of new software. To create the calculator, the computer needs to be given the task in the same way as the foreman explains to workers how to lay bricks. That’s why you can’t do anything without understanding the programming languages. Well, first you need to decide what kind of programming languages we should start with.

And here everyone chooses a language which will be useful for him. It depends on the kind of products you are going to develop. Most of us studied Turbo Pascal at school, and it’s no news that this language is practically not used anymore. So, if you want to join the team of programmers in the nearest future, the choice of language should be made sensibly.

Among the most popular programming languages in 2016 are Java, followed by C languages, then Python, JavaScript, PHP, Ruby, etc. It should come as no surprise that the more popular language is, the more chances you have to find work in the future. So, you’d better start with Java or C#, as these are the best paid and relatively simple learning languages of writing code. If you can’t cope with them, then you should try to learn Python. This language suits for quick and effective programming.

But if you have no programming experience at all you can start with something more simple for understanding. Good examples can be the basics of HTML and CSS.

Why? These two languages are essential for creating static web pages. HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) structures all the text, links, and other content you see on a website. CSS is the language that makes a web page look the way it does—color, layout, and other visuals we call style. Well, if you are interested in making websites, you should definitely start with HTML and CSS.

Let’s move to JavaScript. It is the first full programming language for many people. Why? It is the next logical step after learning HTML and CSS. JavaScript provides the behavior portion of a website. For example, when you see that a form field indicates an error, that’s probably JavaScript at work.

JavaScript has become increasingly popular, and it now lives outside web browsers as well. Learning JavaScript will put you in a good place as it becomes a more general-purpose language.

Some people also suggest choosing Python as the first programming language because Python’s program code is readable, first of all. You don’t even need to be a programmer to understand what is happening in the program. Due to the simple syntax of Python you will need less time for writing programs than in Java, for example. A huge base of libraries will save you a lot of strength, nerves and time. Large technology companies are working with Python: Yandex, Google, Facebook and YouTube. It is used for web applications, game development, software for servers.

Java can also be a good choice for a beginner. This language is more popular than Python, but a bit more complicated. At the same time, the development tools are much better designed. Java is one of the most popular languages for the backend development of modern enterprise web applications. It is used in Amazon, eBay, LinkedIn and Yahoo! With Java and the frameworks based on it, developers can create scaling web apps for a wide range of users. Java is also the primary language used for developing Android applications for smart phones and tablets. Moreover, after Java you will be able to work with low level programming languages.

PHP is one more popular language. The PHP language, along with databases (e.g. MySQL) is an important tool for creating modern web applications. Most of the sites developed on PHP are focused on a large amount of data. It is also a fundamental technology of powerful content management systems like WordPress. There are no normal imports in PHP, there are many solutions to one and the same problem. And it makes training more complicated.


The languages C and C# are a bit complicated for a beginner. But if you develop software for embedded systems, work with system kernels or just want to squeeze out every last drop from all available resources, C is what you need.

Ruby has begun to gain popularity since 2003, when the framework Rails appeared. Used widely among web startups and big companies alike, Ruby and Rails jobs are pretty easy to come by. Ruby and Rails make it easy to transform an idea into a working application, and they have been used to bring us Twitter, GitHub, and Treehouse.

Choosing a programming language may still seem challenging. It shouldn’t. You can’t go wrong. As long as you choose a language that is regularly used in technology today, you’re winning. When you are starting out, the goal is to become solid in the basics, and the basics are pretty similar across almost all modern programming languages.

Part of learning to code is learning a language’s syntax (its grammatical or structural rules). A much bigger part of learning to code, the part that takes longer and gives you more headaches, is learning to solve problems like a programmer. You can learn the grammatical structure of the English language pretty quickly; however, you won’t truly understand the language until you put that grammatical structure to use in a conversation. The same is true in programming. You want to learn the core concepts in order to solve problems. Doing this in one language is similar to doing it in another. Because the core concepts are similar from language to language, I recommend sticking with whichever language you choose until your understanding of the core concepts is solid. If you have a clear idea of your reasons for learning to program, and know exactly what you want to accomplish with your new coding skills, then you’ll be able to make the right choice.

How did you guys get into programming? What are the best programming languages for first-time learners?

Please, share with us your experience and opinion here below🙂


Kate Kviatkovskaya

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Business Development Manager

Skype: kate.kviatkovskaya
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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


Let`s start from a bit of history. React.js is a JavaScript library for building UIs. It was created by Facebook development team to deal with large applications with data that changes over time: react.js hits the “refresh” button any time data changes, and knows to only update the changed parts. Firstly, react was used in-house at Facebook and then it was released as an open-source project and it has quickly gained popularity among developers.

Facebook is not the only one to use React:

Instagram is 100% built on React, both public site and internal tools ;

Yahoo`s mail client is made in React;

Netflix – the biggest paid video-streaming service;

Sberbank, bank #1 in Russia, is built with React;

Khan Academy uses React for most new JS development.

React in comparison to Angular.js isn`t a complete framework. However we can`t say that React.js is only “V” in the MVC. After a closer look, you can actually see that React.js is more than just “V”, it has quite some features of the C (controller) part as well. This is why React is so confusing to understand.

Let`s see why React.js stands out from the crowd:

Convenient architecture

Flux – is highly competitive to MVC. One-way data flow provides maintainability and efficient arrangement of data and DOM elements.

Virtual DOM

React developers suggested using “virtual DOM” in order to solve performance issue for websites with too dynamic DOM. All changes in a document are made there first, and then React looks for the shortest path to apply them in a real DOM tree. This approach makes the framework fast.


React is fundamentally different than other front-end frameworks in that each asset is made up of many isolated components. Want a button changed across the whole platform? Change it once and voilà it`s changed everywhere.

By making the creation, distribution and consumption of isolated reusable components more straightforward, developers are better able to save time by using and creating common abstractions. This is true of both low level elements like buttons and high level elements such as accordions.


React.js uses a special syntax called JSX, which allows to mix HTML with Javascript. Markup and code are composed in the same file. This means code completion gives you a hand as you type references to your component’s functions and variables.

SEO  friendly

React is significantly more SEO friendly than most JavaScript MVC frameworks. As it is based on a virtual DOM you can use it on the server without needing a headless browser on the server such as Phantom.js to render pages to search engine bots.

React.js is a new interesting emerging Javascript library. It does have some drawbacks however it`s an excellent alternative for building large apps where data changes quickly. We are curious to hear about your experience in using React.jsJ Have you tried it?


Anna Kozik

Anna Kozik

Business Development Manager

Skype: kozik_anna
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Altabel Group

Professional Software Development



Whether you’re building apps for the browser, mobile or desktop, Aurelia can enable you to not only create amazing UI, but do it in a way that is maintainable, testable and extensible.

Retrospective and today

Aurelia is a project of Rob Eisenberg, the author of a very popular MV * – framework for Caliburn.Micro XAML-platforms, Durandal. Understanding all the disadvantages of Durandal, Eisenberg engaged in the development of so-called NextGen framework. In 2014 he began to work in Angular team on the second version of the framework. However, several months later, Rob decided to leave the Angular team since the direction of Angular 2, in his opinion, had changed a lot. He gathered a large team and returned to work on the framework of his dreams. And Aurelia is the result of that work.

JavaScript of tomorrow?

By using modern tooling Aurelia was written from the ground up in ECMAScript 2016. This means you have native modules, classes, decorators and more at disposal.
Aurelia is written in modern and future JavaScript, it takes a nowadays approach to architecture. It’s built as a series of collaborating libraries, which form a powerful and robust framework for building Single Page Apps (SPAs). However, Aurelia’s libraries can often be used individually, in traditional web sites or even on the server-side through technologies like NodeJS.
Aurelia’s code is open sourced under the MIT License, a very permissive license used by many popular web projects today. The starter kits are available under the Creative Commons 0 license. There is also a Contributor for those who wish to join the team in working on Aurelia. Ultimately, this means that you can use Aurelia without fear of legal repercussions and it can be build in the same confidence.

Benefits of Aurelia

Clean and Unobtrusive – Aurelia is the only framework that lets you build components with plain JavaScript. It stays out of your way so your code remains clean and easy to evolve over time.

Convention over Configuration – Simple conventions help developers follow solid patterns and reduce the amount of code they have to write and maintain. It also means less fiddling with framework APIs and more focus on their app.

Simple, But Not Simplistic – Because of the simple design developers are able to learn a very small set of patterns and APIs that unlock limitless possibilities.

Promotes the “-ilities” – Testability, maintainability, extensibility, learnability, etc.- Aurelia’s design helps developers to naturally write code that exhibits these desirable characteristics.

Amazingly Extensible – Aurelia is highly modular and designed to be customized easily, so developers will never hit a roadblock or have to “hack” the framework to succeed.

Web Standards Focused – Focused on next generation JavaScript and Web Components, and avoiding unnecessary abstractions that obscure the underlying web, Aurelia is the cleanest and most standards-compliant framework today.

Integrates Well with Others – Easily integrated with any 3rd party library or framework: for instance, with jQuery, React, Polymer, Bootstrap, MaterializeCSS and much more.

TypeScript Support – Each Aurelia library is released with its own d.ts files. There are also official TypeScript beginner kits and production quality starter kits.

An Official Product with Commercial Support – Being an official product of Durandal Inc., it has commercial and enterprise support available, so you can use Aurelia for building core technology for your business.

Thriving Community and Ecosystem – Having one of the largest developer gitter channels in the JavaScript world, oodles of contributors and a huge core team, Aurelia has been used to build just about every type of application and is used by large, well-known multi-national companies and enterprises.
Aurelia, Angular and React.js – what’s common and what’s different?

Aurelia vs. Angular

Similarities between Aurelia and Angular 2:

  • Aurelia offers ES6-support out of the box and supports all forms of alternative abstraction syntax such as TypeScript and CoffeeScript. Migration documentation about migrating from Angular 1 and 2 have been put on the roadmap.
  • The basis of both Angular 2 and Aurelia application comprise components associated with the corresponding template.
  • Differences in vision details and options range:

  • The syntax is much simpler and more explicit (i.e. self-explanatory) than Angular 2 and looks a lot like standard JS syntax. ES6 and JSPM are used by default and a gulp file with a custom-built system to transpile ES6 to ES5 using the Babel transpiler is included in the standard package.
  • Aurelia also uses conventions instead of its own syntax and boilerplate code. No special characters like the ones in Angular 2 (*, (), [] en #) here.
  • Aurelia is built in a modular way making it very pluggable. You can plug in internationalization, routing, virtualization, animation, … Besides that, third party plugins are available as well such as the aurelia-flux plugin adding the Flux dispatcher to Aurelia.
  • The presence of a root-component is necessary; it represents an application (app). The metadata may / should be attached to components by using decorators. Component initialization is performed by using dependency injection. In addition, each component has a declared lifecycle, which can be built by using the lifecycle hooks. The components may be formulated into a hierarchical structure.
  • Communication between the component and the template is performed by using data binding. The process of template rendering to the final HTML can be integrated by using pipes (Angular) or value converters + binding behaviours (Aurelia).
  • The main advantage of Aurelia in comparison to Angular is an advanced composition mechanism and template parts. Aurelia is designed with an emphasis on unobtrusive, the number of framework structures in the final code is minimal. Aurelia is more compact, while Angular sometimes simply forces to produce copy-paste.
  • Aurelia is new to the market while Angular has a big user base because it’s already been around for 6 years. On the other hand, Aurelia has great documentation available, it’s an official product of Durandal Inc, and the company has a long term vision for the product, something the Angular team doesn’t seem to have and is blamed for a lot.

Aurelia vs. React.js

  • While on the surface it might not seem fair to compare Aurelia to React.js, they’re both being used for the same things. Despite the fact that React.js is a fully-fledged and functionally released product without the early preview alpha tag and Aurelia is not, at current stage they are both pretty at the same level. You can achieve the same tasks within both, just in different ways.
  • As for React components and Aurelia’s ViewModel’s, they are both quite similar in that you’re essentially using a class to define properties and methods bound to a particular view. The primary difference between them is React doesn’t separate the logic from the view, meaning in React the View and ViewModel are both within the same file.
  • However, that’s not to say that Aurelia doesn’t allow you to achieve the same thing by rendering the View from within the ViewModel as well and forgoing a traditional View.
  • The original intent behind React.js was not to be a competitor to the likes of Angular or Aurelia, but rather be the library that everyone uses with their SPA framework like Angular to improve performance.
  • Therefore, this means you can easily use React.js within Aurelia. Aurelia and React.js can be used together and in doing so, it provides you with a level of power other frameworks cannot without subsequent complexity and strict convention like EmberJS.

Aurelia vs. Angular and React

  • Two-way binding is provided out of the box and the framework does so very precisely. By default, 1-way databinding is used except for form controls, a clear plus when compared to React. Do keep in mind that two-way data binding can only be done through explicit syntax, as is the case in Angular 2.
  • The learning curve for Aurelia is comparable to that of Angular 2 and thus a lot steeper than React’s. Luckily, the extensive documentation makes up for that a great deal.
  • Angular 2 and Aurelia Architecture is very similar. Aurelia looks a lot like Angular 2 in the sense that it’s a complete framework that relies on the web standards. It’s as pluggable as React is and as Angular 2 will be.
  • While Angular was created by Google and React by Facebook, they don’t provide commercial or enterprise support, something that Aurelia will do.


It goes without saying why these three frameworks are so popular. They all have a lot of strong advantages. Eventually, I’m favoring Aurelia: there’s solid documentation available and the overall philosophy is the same with Angular 2, but Aurelia is a better choice from the syntax and execution point of view. The architecture and syntax vision of Aurelia team seems to be more clear than the vision of the Angular team. The company and enterprise support of Aurelia is also a big pro.
What is your personal experience with these frameworks? Which one would you choose for your projects and why? What’s your prediction “who” will win the crown in the nearest future? Please feel free to share your thoughts with us.

Thank you in advance!


Darya Bertosh

Darya Bertosh

Business Development Manager

Skype: darya.bertosh
LI Profile: Darya Bertosh



Altabel Group

Professional Software Development


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