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Archive for the ‘LinkedIn’ Category

 

“Computer programming is an art, because it applies accumulated knowledge to the world, because it requires skill and ingenuity, and especially because it produces objects of beauty.”
Donald Knuth, 1974

 

It’s better to start your journey into the career of programming by answering the question “Do you really need programming?” This question does not apply to those, who majored in computer programming or was close to it. If at school you were good at math, if you like to spend a lot of time sitting in front of the computer, if you want to learn something new, then programming is for you. What is more, this area is now in demand and highly paid in the world, job vacancies for the post of programmers are always open. Isn’t it the best time to be a programmer?🙂

Everyone knows that the future programmer should be able to think broadly and to present the project from different perspectives before its implementation and realization. Unfortunately, the machine does not understand a human language. Of course, I’m not talking about Siri and other voice recognition — I’m talking about the creation of new software. To create the calculator, the computer needs to be given the task in the same way as the foreman explains to workers how to lay bricks. That’s why you can’t do anything without understanding the programming languages. Well, first you need to decide what kind of programming languages we should start with.

And here everyone chooses a language which will be useful for him. It depends on the kind of products you are going to develop. Most of us studied Turbo Pascal at school, and it’s no news that this language is practically not used anymore. So, if you want to join the team of programmers in the nearest future, the choice of language should be made sensibly.

Among the most popular programming languages in 2016 are Java, followed by C languages, then Python, JavaScript, PHP, Ruby, etc. It should come as no surprise that the more popular language is, the more chances you have to find work in the future. So, you’d better start with Java or C#, as these are the best paid and relatively simple learning languages of writing code. If you can’t cope with them, then you should try to learn Python. This language suits for quick and effective programming.

But if you have no programming experience at all you can start with something more simple for understanding. Good examples can be the basics of HTML and CSS.

Why? These two languages are essential for creating static web pages. HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) structures all the text, links, and other content you see on a website. CSS is the language that makes a web page look the way it does—color, layout, and other visuals we call style. Well, if you are interested in making websites, you should definitely start with HTML and CSS.

Let’s move to JavaScript. It is the first full programming language for many people. Why? It is the next logical step after learning HTML and CSS. JavaScript provides the behavior portion of a website. For example, when you see that a form field indicates an error, that’s probably JavaScript at work.

JavaScript has become increasingly popular, and it now lives outside web browsers as well. Learning JavaScript will put you in a good place as it becomes a more general-purpose language.

Some people also suggest choosing Python as the first programming language because Python’s program code is readable, first of all. You don’t even need to be a programmer to understand what is happening in the program. Due to the simple syntax of Python you will need less time for writing programs than in Java, for example. A huge base of libraries will save you a lot of strength, nerves and time. Large technology companies are working with Python: Yandex, Google, Facebook and YouTube. It is used for web applications, game development, software for servers.

Java can also be a good choice for a beginner. This language is more popular than Python, but a bit more complicated. At the same time, the development tools are much better designed. Java is one of the most popular languages for the backend development of modern enterprise web applications. It is used in Amazon, eBay, LinkedIn and Yahoo! With Java and the frameworks based on it, developers can create scaling web apps for a wide range of users. Java is also the primary language used for developing Android applications for smart phones and tablets. Moreover, after Java you will be able to work with low level programming languages.

PHP is one more popular language. The PHP language, along with databases (e.g. MySQL) is an important tool for creating modern web applications. Most of the sites developed on PHP are focused on a large amount of data. It is also a fundamental technology of powerful content management systems like WordPress. There are no normal imports in PHP, there are many solutions to one and the same problem. And it makes training more complicated.

 

 
The languages C and C# are a bit complicated for a beginner. But if you develop software for embedded systems, work with system kernels or just want to squeeze out every last drop from all available resources, C is what you need.

Ruby has begun to gain popularity since 2003, when the framework Rails appeared. Used widely among web startups and big companies alike, Ruby and Rails jobs are pretty easy to come by. Ruby and Rails make it easy to transform an idea into a working application, and they have been used to bring us Twitter, GitHub, and Treehouse.

Choosing a programming language may still seem challenging. It shouldn’t. You can’t go wrong. As long as you choose a language that is regularly used in technology today, you’re winning. When you are starting out, the goal is to become solid in the basics, and the basics are pretty similar across almost all modern programming languages.

Part of learning to code is learning a language’s syntax (its grammatical or structural rules). A much bigger part of learning to code, the part that takes longer and gives you more headaches, is learning to solve problems like a programmer. You can learn the grammatical structure of the English language pretty quickly; however, you won’t truly understand the language until you put that grammatical structure to use in a conversation. The same is true in programming. You want to learn the core concepts in order to solve problems. Doing this in one language is similar to doing it in another. Because the core concepts are similar from language to language, I recommend sticking with whichever language you choose until your understanding of the core concepts is solid. If you have a clear idea of your reasons for learning to program, and know exactly what you want to accomplish with your new coding skills, then you’ll be able to make the right choice.

How did you guys get into programming? What are the best programming languages for first-time learners?

Please, share with us your experience and opinion here below🙂

 

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Business Development Manager | LI Profile

E-mail:Kate.Kviatkovskaya@altabel.com
Skype: kate.kviatkovskaya
www.altabel.com

With more than 90 million users worldwide, LinkedIn has established itself as the premier social networking site for professionals. LinkedIn is the ultimate social platform for professionals: in addition to making connections, you can get introductions, obtain recommendations and collaborate with hundreds of industry professionals and peers in your network.

Bellow you may find some tips and tricks propelling people toward success in LI. Feel free to take them on board if you are willing to take 100% advantage of LinkedIn.

Eric Saint-Guillain, Independent Financial Consultant and Interim Manager advises:
«First, complete your profile with all your professional experiences with clear job descriptions, and put your strong points in evidence. Try to have recommendations from different relationship partners (customers, former colleagues, managers) in order to increase your e-reputation.
Participate also to groups and to question and answers. The quality of your questions and answers is much more important than the quantity. Other important principle from networking and not only applicable to Linkedin: provide services or advices to your network partners without expecting something in exchange. Good partners will come back to you one day or another.»

«LinkedIn helps you build and maintain your network of professional relationships.
You will get out of LinkedIn what you put into it, thus:
– Complete your profile so others can know you better. Your Summary should be a WOW piece since that is what people look at first.
– Use the Outlook Toolbar to LinkedIn your existing contacts to grow your network.
First time through, only invite those with the blue LI symbol that indicates they are already on LI.
– Play around with “Settings” to see what is best for you.
– ALWAYS personalize an invitation (if you can) to reflect where/when/how you met or the common ground or reason you wish to connect. Make it easy for the person to remember you and accept your invitation.
– Get active in Q&A so that folks understand you better.
– Join relevant groups and get involved with people that you can connect with and get to know.»
Bryan C Webb, P. Eng.
President/CEO at Norton Scientific Inc

«1. Make sure your profile can turn a viewer into a visitor to your website.
2. Participate in groups. Answer questions. Update your status. Comment on others.
3. Don’t ever spam.»
Mike Seidle
CTO at VPS

«The wonderful thing about LinkedIn is you can get more personable than you can on your resume. It is the perfect tool to “toot your own horn without blowing it”. Here are just of few items that I advise people to do to get maximum exposure on both LinkedIn and their Google search:
• Profile – Building a complete profile that emphasizes on your strengths.
• Contacts – Connect with people you trust and that have the same goal you do for LinkedIn.
• Groups – Don’t only join groups but get involved in their discussions.
• Jobs – Download the JobInsider Toolbar to save you time and have your resources at hand.
• Companies – Follow companies and stay on top of their changes.
• Events – Register for networking events.»
Phyllis Steele
Corporate Administration

«1. You will not go far without a 100% complete profile (photo, 3 recommendations, and keyword-rich summary). When people do a search on LinkedIn for someone with your skills/experience, you want to show up, so make sure all applicable keywords are in your summary.
2. The heart of networking is giving when you have the opportunity. So find or even create opportunities to give, through groups or Q&A.
3. LI is a great vehicle for personal branding. Between its SEO effectiveness and various Applications (portfolio displays for artists, blog integration, etc), there’s tremendous opportunity to tell the world you exist and why we should care.»
Ed Han

«1) Every 4-6 weeks send a brand agnostic resource to your network
2) Be a matchmaker and help introduce people who need to know each other.
3) When you start a discussion, don’t start it and run. Circle back and make sure you actually facilitate a discussion.
4) Everyone’s favorite subject is them, not you so look for social cues in their status updates, their reading list, trip it, perhaps they blog etc.
5) Spend the 30 seconds to actually write an invitation to connect instead of the always lame LinkedIn Invitation Template.
6) Don’t just accept invites, write a note and, get this . . . be “social”
7) Understand that whether you have 10 connections or 10,000 they are totally useless until you move these virtual relationships to real time. »
Paul Castain

So these are I think quite valuable tips and tricks from LI members. Feel free to leave a comment with your favorite LinkedIn tricks.

Best Regards,
Kristina Kozlova
Altabel Group
www.altabel.com

Today there are hundreds of social networking sites (Friendster, imeem, Flickr, Myspace, Plaxo, Xanga, the list goes on) that are connecting people with different background, interests, hobbies and professions around the world.

The three major sites that are in the forefront are Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.  What, you may ask, is the difference between the three?  Which one will be the most beneficial for business?  Depending on you or your company’s goals and objectives, you will hopefully have a clearer perspective of which service best fits your business.

Bellow you may find a sort of an overview of the basic differences between Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.

Sean Patrick
Sales Trainer & Sales Mentor at Sean Patrick,
Sales Director at Global VIsual Solutions Ltd:

“Facebook is good for brand awareness and building, twitter is a micro blog and can be hard to target your niche and linkedin does a lot more than both facebook and twitter and is taken a lot more seriously.”

Josh Chandler
Virtual Assistant for Business Professionals:

“It all depends what you mean by business purposes. Do you mean you want to use a social network to increase revenues, increase subscriptions to an email newsletter etc. In my opinion, each serves different benefits for businesses. Twitter for instance is uniquely positioned as being a popular real-time social network. This means that if you want to promote a product on a limited time period, it would be more suitable to use Twitter to reach an audience quickly.
Facebook on the other hand is more so about the brand awareness. Therefore it would be better suited towards long-term gains in website traffic, RSS subscribers and email newsletter subscriptions. LinkedIn is definitely more suited for connecting business professionals together who may wish to do joint ventures. Again, each network really will only work when you’ve distinguished and set goals on what you want to achieve for your business.”

Robert Burns, II
Public Relations & Social Media Specialist ♦ Writing Specialist:

“A large part of social media effectiveness, especially for business purposes, depends on where your AUDIENCE is. The answer to your question can and will vary drastically, based on the product or service each business offers, their current clientele, potential clientele, and short/long-term goals. I do not believe there is a best; it simply depends. A strong social media strategy will efficiently and effectively make use of more than one (but not too many; two or three is plenty) social media platforms, cross-linking between them and keeping a consistent brand for all of them.

FACEBOOK: It’s hard to argue with 400+ million regular users. Right now, they’ve got the numbers, and their users are engaged. I recommend every professional have a FB.

TWITTER: Growing fast, more useful if you can consistently post new, relevant content, ask relevant questions, and engage Tweeters. Good as well.

LINKEDIN: This platform captures the professional demographic that is not quite seen in such force on Twitter or Facebook. Both of those sites have them, but this site is DEDICATED to it, and there are a lot less frivolous status comments about “what people had for breakfast” and what have you.

As you can see, there are upsides (and downsides) to each one. It all depends on your business, audience, and ultimate purpose.”

Peter B. Giblett CITP, LLB
Business Strategist-Speaker-Author (Social Media & IT):

“All have their advantages and disadvantages. Starting with LinkedIn it is not possible to use it to build a corporate brand – all interaction has to be personal and promotional activity is not allowed. Any contribution made would have to be purely personal, although there is nothing stopping a person from using clever wording in a forum such as Answers to build brand awareness. Twitter possibly offers the best business capability. It is possible to have an account in the name of the business, and to promote your brand directly. However too much of this and you are likely to lose credibility and followers. With Facebook it is possible to build a business fan page which can act as a centre of attention for people interested in the brand and its activities. In all cases it is best to focus on the needs of your followers in building the brand image – e.g. become the industry expert rather than purely promoting your own products. Social media is a place to demonstrate expertise rather than to advertise.”

Emmajane Taylor-Moran
Employment Solicitor at Webster Dixon LLP:

“LinkedIn is my preference for business use. Facebook is too social (my teenage daughter is addicted to it, and I think it is really aimed at that market, not for professionals). Twitter – well I just don’t have time to narrate my life, and nobody would be that interested in it anyway!”

What do you think? What concerns do you have about which social networks to join?

Best Regards,
Kristina Kozlova
http://www.altabel.com

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