Altabel Group's Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Gartner

IT Trends

Is Nordics pioneering IoT? From remote
control to autonomous connected things
and intelligent decision making. Initiatives from
Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland:
start-ups and industry leaders engaged.

 
Nordic countries are leading the way in the Internet of Things, the latest ‘Connected things’ study by TeliaSonera shows. There will be ~4 connected devices per person in the Nordics by 2018, Gartner Inc. predicts. Currently the Scandinavian region has 4 times as many connected “things” per person as the rest of the world.

map

The TeliaSonera report forecasts the Nordic market for IoT devices will grow by 23% annually, to €9.1bn by 2018: with Sweden placed first, Norway and Denmark – placed 2nd and 3rd,  and followed by Finland.

Connected vehicles, connected building and connected people are the three driving forces for developments in connected cars, smart homes and digital health.

 

internet of things

The fastest growing segment of IoT in Scandinavia is ‘connected people’ which includes not only people, but also animals. The market for connected people is expected to grow by 59% annually until 2018. ‘Connected vehicles’ (anything that transports passengers or cargo) sector is forecast to increase by 36% annually. ‘Connected buildings’ sector is expected to grow by 23% annually until 2018, when there will be, on average, 3 connected building devices, such as security, energy and HVAC, per household in the Nordics.

Impressive, but connected devices are only the first stage of IoT. “Enabling connected things to exchange and comprehend each other’s data, regardless of place, manufacturer or format, is key to realising the full potential of IoT, ” said Anders Elbak from IDC. So the aim is that “connected cars transform into intelligent transportation systems, connected medical devices into digital health and connected homes into smart cities.”

From the business prospective, Elbak pointed out  that “very few [companies] acknowledge the business transformation opportunities” – or how to best make use of the vast amounts of data ‘connected devices’ generate to enable intelligent decision making, research and development and predictive services.

In the study by Accenture the Nordics are placed among the countries with the most conducive environment for Industrial IoT, along with the US, Switzerland and the Netherlands; while China, Japan, and Germany are just mid-table performers.

Recently in the Scandinavian region there have been several promising practical initiatives in the field of IoT, on radar both in start-ups and industry leaders.

In Norway, Nornir’s ‘smart home’ project addresses the expected elderly boom problem by providing the opportunity for them to live at home. The smart home environment accommodates intelligent sensors that monitor changes in the environment and the security system which recognises individualized patterns deviations and gives instant alerts to the ‘stakeholders’ if smth happens out of the ordinary.

Also one of the first worldwide real-time data linking systems is being implemented in Norway by Synaptic Technologies, and their Real Time Web (RTW) ambitiously strives to be a world-wide open platform for everybody to share and exchange readable or writable machine data online and for intelligent objects to be connected.

In Sweden, the startup Automile is tapping into telematics and untraditional cloud-powered fleet management. CEO Jens Nylander explained old legacy solutions typically require quite expensive physical installations and modifications to the car – meaning dependency on retailers and installers. Targeting primarily at smaller business, Automile operates on a SaaS model where the device itself is free and users pay a subscription fee. Interesting that big names like ABB and Ricoh International are now among the customers.

Thingsquare, Swedish IoT pioneer, provides the software platform allowing you to connect all your products with smartphones wirelessly.

Also the Swedish car manufacturer Volvo has introduced a cloud-based communications system for road safety: the tech is piloted in Sweden and Norway, where weather conditions can be suitably extreme, and it’s hoped the system will be standard in Scandinavia already in 2016 and is even a part of the governmental program.

The Swedish multinational provider of communications Ericsson recognises “Networked Society” as its core directive to align with IoT thinking aiming at connecting 50 billion devices by 2020; all in order to benefit its subscribers.

In Finland the IoT initiative is represented by BaseN Platform – a highly scalable and easily distributed IoT platform, enabling required scalability for hosting millions of things.

These are just a few interesting starts, still many more to mention are: from Sweden – Yanzi Networks, one of Intel’s innovation labs,  Imagimob with Artificial Intelligence innovation for torso body tracking through embedded, wearables and mobile devices,  Connode with unique position in Smart Metering Market, Springworks known for its machine-to-humanity (M2H) connectivity innovaton, FarmDrones with a connected solution for farmers to increase productivity and crops yield,  Watty with the next generation energy product, Ewa Home, hidn Tempo, Minalyze; from Norway – Nordic (Semiconductor); from Finland – CyberLightning with its Smart city concept at the industrial scale, etc.

Have more interesting examples, or wish to share your point of view? You are welcome to leave your comment here.

 

Helen Boyarchuk

Helen Boyarchuk

Business Development Manager

E-mail: helen.boyarchuk@altabel.com
Skype: helen_boyarchuk
LI Profile: Helen Boyarchuk

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com

We said goodbye to the year 2013 and welcomed the year 2014. Businesses had time to reflect on the last year and now it is high time for business leaders to look at the projected trends of 2014 to ensure their organization is prepared for what is next.

The top ten technologies and trends that will be strategic for most organizations in 2014 have been recently highlighted by analysts at Gartner, Inc. It has been also emphasized that the most important trend for all enterprises is to determine their strategic technology and to follow it over the next three years.

Let’s have a deeper look at which technological trends are expected to make up IT market in 2014:

Mobile Device Diversity and Management

 The consequences of the bring your own device (BYOD) trend is doubling or even tripling the size of the mobile workforce and it’s placing a tremendous strain on IT and finance departments. Gartner said that through 2018, the growing variety of mobile devices, computing styles and user contexts will make everything-anywhere strategies “unachievable.” Organizations need to totally review their BYOD policies and place emphasis on expectation about what employees can and cannot do and balance confidentiality and privacy requirements.

Mobile Applications

For mobile application environments, Gartner predicts the future lies in HTML5 and the browser due to continued JavaScript performance improvements. With more and more users wanting to work across multiple devices, Gartner recommended app developers work to create building blocks that can be assembled to fit the needs of different devices. Overall, it predicted that for 2014 there will be more popularity in smaller, more targeted apps than more comprehensive, one-size-fits-all apps.

The Internet of Everything

 The Internet is expanding beyond PCs and mobile devices into enterprise assets such as field equipment, and consumer items such as cars and televisions. The problem is that most enterprises and technology vendors have yet to explore the possibilities of an expanded internet and are not operationally or organizationally ready. Imagine digitizing the most important products, services and assets. The combination of data streams and services created by digitizing everything creates four basic usage models – Manage; Monetize; Operate; Extend. These four basic models can be applied to any of the four “internets” (people, things, information and places). Enterprises should not limit themselves to thinking that only the Internet of Things (i.e., assets and machines) has the potential to leverage these four models. Enterprises from all industries (heavy, mixed, and weightless) can leverage these four models.

Cloud/Client Architecture

As the power and capability of many mobile devices increases, the increased demand on networks, the cost of networks, and the need to manage bandwidth use “creates incentives, in some cases, to minimize the cloud application computing and storage footprint, and to exploit the intelligence and storage of the client device.” As mobile users continue to demand more complex uses of their mobile technologies, it will drive a need for higher levels of server-side computing and storage capacity.

The Era of the Personal Cloud

It is predicted that the push for more personal cloud technologies will lead to a shift toward services and away from devices. Previously, devices were of the highest priority. Now that will change. The type of device one has will be less important, although the devices will still be necessary. Users will use a collection of devices, with the PC remaining one of many options, but none of the devices will be the primary hub. It’s the personal cloud that will take on that role. Access to the cloud and the content stored or shared from the cloud will be managed and secured, rather than solely focusing on the device itself.

Software Defined Anything

Gartner sees an increased role for software in the datacenter. Software is now able to data center more hardware more efficiently and easily than ever imagined before.  With Software-Defined Everything, the computing infrastructure is virtualized and delivered as a service.  As it grows, more and more standards and regulations will pop up over 2014. Vendors are expected to be in particular reluctant to adopt standards that will affect the bottom line. However, on the bright side, it said the end consumer will benefit from simplicity, cost reduction opportunities and the possibility for consolidation.

Smart Machines

These are intelligent personal assistants, smart advisors, advanced global industrial systems, autonomous vehicles. This seems to be the next big thing as it has a huge potential for future development. Analytics from Gartner predicts that through 2020 the smart machines will become a part of everyday life as well as have widespread and deep business impact. So there is a lot of success to be found for those who jump on board the trend early.

3-D Printing

According to Gartner, 3D printing is not just for printing toys and jewelry.  It is supposed to have a high impact on many industries, including consumer products, industrial and manufacturing. The sales of 3D printers are expected to grow by 75 percent in 2014 and almost double in 2015.

Looking at all these predictions can be a bit confusing and frightning for some enterprise organizations. However, it is essential to look at these trends with a long‐term mindset. Many of these trends will be a continual evolution for organizations over the next several years. It’s time to think strategically about the state of technology and evaluate how it can shape the future of your business.

What do you think of these predictions? Is there smth missed or wrong in your opinion? Please feel free to share your thoughts 🙂

 

Yuliya Tolkach

Yuliya Tolkach
Yulia.Tolkach@altabel.com
Skype ID: yuliya_tolkach
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

All of these mobile devices were supposed to make our jobs easier. On a flight? Edit your presentation from your tablet at 10,000 feet. Working from home? Review a time-sensitive document on your smartphone. This was the popular narrative on-the-go workers told themselves, and it was a good story – but it was a fictitious one.

Editing a Word document on an Android phone was not easy, nor was editing an Excel spreadsheet on an iPad. The Microsoft Office that workers know today is still stuck in its original design meant for a desktop computer. And when mobile users tried to download workaround applications, they often found so-called solutions that failed to live up to their promises. That, finally, is changing.

The market is now producing tools that offer a true fix to the mobile workflow challenge, with functionality to address every pain point that has throbbed in recent years. We have entered an era of all-in-one mobile productivity, although the difficulties of the recent past have left mobile enterprises skeptical of a brighter present and future.

That skepticism is understandable. Because Microsoft doesn’t offer an Office version for iPads, Android phones or any of the other popular mobile devices or operating systems that today’s workforce uses to stay connected, those workers had to build their own connectivity to their offices, coworkers and clients. For example, if a mobile worker wanted to revise a Word document on an iPad, he might have a complex recipe in place to make a few simple edits, and now IT solutions have arisen to fill each gap:

Step one: gain access. To even open the file, the mobile worker had to email the attachment to himself or open an account with a cloud storage service like Box.

Step two: view the file. Next, he might have downloaded an operating system-agnostic productivity app like Open Office to open the file on his mobile device and see whatever text, tables or graphics it contained.

Step three: edit or annotate. This can be the most difficult step, since some viewing apps don’t offer editing capabilities. At this stage, an additional annotation app comes into play for writing notes or changing the Word file.

Step four: save and share. To share an edited, annotated file from his mobile device, the user might have opted for Box or Dropbox. Enterprises should use more stringent criteria to leverage combined file access, viewing, editing and sharing on one interface for mobile enterprise workers. There are several mobile-friendly apps that aim to replicate the editing control you have from your desktop, while also building the cloud’s accessibility into their DNA.

Step five: secure. While it’s important that mobile workers can access files from anywhere, risk-averse enterprise users also have to ensure that unauthorised parties can’t access those files. Dropbox and Box have begun building security controls to accommodate enterprise security needs, such as permissions in Dropbox for Teams; however, these controls pale in comparison to security applied directly to a file, rather than the cloud compartment it lives in, for the inevitable point when that file is shared offline, outside the cloud.

IT department concerns with compatibility are no longer limited to “dumb” phones that are solely used for calls or simple text emails. The next generation of enterprise IT problems involve ensuring file compatibility and security across operating systems. Some organisations will even limit employees’ bring-your-own-device (BYOD) practices to one OS (like an iPhone) altogether just to avoid the issues that stem from this type of segmentation. The result has been frustration among on-the-go employees, suppressed productivity, and company fear regarding mobile access.

This trend will only continue to grow. By 2017, according to several forecasts by Gartner and Forrester, tablet sales will outnumber desktop sales. In addition, we’re likely to see mobile phone shipments (mostly smartphones) grow to more than 2 billion in 2017, according to Gartner.

To keep pace with the growing employee demand for mobile access and collaboration solutions, businesses must rely on technologies that keep information safe and increase mobile productivity, which is a combination rarely seen in today’s market. This means scrapping piecemeal solutions that only address one aspect of the mobile-user experience and implementing an all-in-one solution that facilitates secure access, editing and collaboration, and control over a file’s complete lifecycle in order to track recipients and revoke access at anytime if needed.

The future belongs to computing on the move. That future is now for enterprises and employees that select secure, native Microsoft Office functionality and collaboration tools for their mobile devices.

To conduct everyday business, mobile users have been forced to download multiple apps to help them access, edit and annotate Microsoft Office files. They have settled for insecure cloud file services for sharing. The time for settling is over. Enterprise IT needs to deliver instant access to any file from anywhere, and companies can now achieve this. Mobile devices were supposed to make our jobs easier. With the recent evolution in mobile collaboration tools, they do.

 

Kristina Kozlova

Marketing Manager

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com

According to Gartner’s predictions, by 2012, 50% of traveling workers will leave their notebooks at home in favor of other devices such as iPad, Tablets, and Smartphones.

By 2012, 80% of all commercial software will include elements of open-source technology. Many open-source technologies are mature, stable and well supported. Open Source is here to stay. Such as: specific applications such as Gimp (GIMP.ORG) which are now contenders for the commercial market. Look at the CRM market for good open source examples.

By 2012, at least one-third of business application software spending will be as service subscription instead of as product license (SaaS). The web will allow SaaS providers to compete worldwide against established players. Cloud computing & SaaS will be a big push this year – Microsoft, Oracle, Apple, etc are all moving in that directions. I think this will be big for development projects – many organizations will be showing Proof of Concepts with it — and it offers an option to crowded data centers. This type of development will go in conjunction with the changing view of Desktop platforms to the new alternative devices.

Personally, I don’t subscribe to Gartner’s views since they get it close 33% of the time. The OSS trend has been happening for 10 years now, the mobile trend has been visible for some 3-4 years now, and the service oriented trend has been visible for some 8 years now. They have little forward thinking.

In my opinion right now the trend is towards mobile. If you are a developer and you are not developing your application to run on mobile devices, you are behind. IOS, Android, Mac OSX, and Linux are the targets developers need to focus upon.

The next top trend is HTML5 which lends itself to the cross-platform need above. HTML5 still has a fair amount of shortcomings from a consumer perspective, but will solve those when the applications truly require the missing functionality.

Finally, the consumer markets are hot. Enterprise business continues to trudge along, but if you look around consumerization is everywhere.

So in summary, the trends are mobile/cross platform, HTML5/CSS3, and consumer focused software.

One last moment to think about. The software market is changing rapidly, a far faster pace than Moore’s law predicts. Hardware is also changing rapidly – ARM has changed the mobile industry and is about to change a lot more in the coming months. Software developers need to be looking much further ahead than Gartner just to keep up.

Best Regards,

Kristina Kozlova

Marketing Manager

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com

Apple’s iPad will have overwhelming majority of 2011 sales, but by end of 2015, Android expected to run on 36 percent of tablets.

Apple created the modern tablet market, and its iPad has become the undisputed king of tablet computers. The iPad promises to hold that dominance for years to come, research firm Gartner said.

Apple’s iPad will command 73.4 percent of global tablet sales in 2011 and will hold the majority of tablet sales until 2014, Gartner said.

In 2015, Apple will still be dominant over Android tablets and others, with 46 percent of the market. In that year, however, Android tablets and even some from Microsoft and Research in Motion will gain ground, Gartner said.

Gartner analyst Carolina Milanesi said Apple does so well because Apple delivers a superior and unified user experience across its hardware, software and services. Apple had the foresight to create this market and in doing that, planned for it, as far as component supplies such as memory and screen. This allowed Apple to bring the iPad out at a very competitive price and no compromise in experience among the different models that offer storage and connectivity options.

By comparison, Android tablets will account for 17.3 percent of sales in 2011, Gartner said, while any other platform will have no more than 5 percent.

According to the survey, overall in 2011, tablet computer sales globally will top 63 million devices, an increase of 261 percent over last year.

It is predicted, that by the end of 2015, tablet sales will reach 326 million devices.

As expected, the iPad will have the overwhelming majority of 2011 tablet sales, with 73.4 percent, or nearly 46.7 million total. Android’s total in 2011 will be 17.3 percent, or 11 million.

In 2015, Gartner said Android will grow to 116 million tablet sales, compared to 148 million for Apple.
Also in 2015, Microsoft tablets and Research in Motion’s QNX-based tablet will be sizable market forces. Microsoft is expected to sell 34 million units in 2015, while RIM’s will sell 26 million, Gartner said.
For 2015, Gartner’s forecasts give Apple 46 percent of the tablet market, followed by Android devices at 36 percent, Microsoft at 11 percent and QNX at 8 percent.

So what are your thoughts on this research? What do you think, who will take the lead? What are you predictions?

It would be great to hear your comments and assumptions on that point.

Kind Regards,

Natalia Osipchik

Business Development Manager

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com

The debate on the success of outsourcing as an industry seems to last endlessly. Over the years outsourcing contracts underwent a lot of changes – as the result we now see more multi-sourcing engagements and smaller focused contracts. In fact outsourcing contracts shrank in length or value per contract, but the relationship with the client has endured. Indeed, it’s relations, not size that matters. So, recently the issue of a choice of a right vendor for an outsourcing contract has become even sharper and vital for a larger number of companies in IT industry.

Many organizations that want to outsource IT services are intimidated by the task of determining which location in general and vendor in particular would best suit their requirements. Many researches in the field have been made. If in the early days of outsourcing price level was the weightiest criterion, now determination of an outsourcing partner and their geo-location is based on a whole system of criteria including not solely cost competitiveness based ones but key statistics on resources and skills level, country’s business and economic environment. Among them you may see English (French, German, etc) language skills, educational system quality, cultural compatibility, political and economic environment, global and legal maturity, and data and intellectual property security and privacy.

Historically such low-cost locations as India for instance were very popular offshore outsourcing destinations, still recently with the maturation of IT domain and with recent wage inflation and educational challenges these locations have receded their position as outsourcers now expect more “added value” to their projects and business. In this respect more attention is paid to Eastern European region, especially by Western and Northern European companies. Germany, Switzerland and Austria along with the Nordics in particular perceive Eastern Europe as a favored nearshore destination. Eastern Europe ranks high in terms of efficiency of technical education, work ethics and cultural sensitivity adding to the region’s geo-attractiveness as a base for outsourced activity.

Many respectable researchers think in the next ten years it is likely that Eastern Europe will move out from being an ‘emerging destination’ to a ‘key destination’ for outsourced activity: even though facing continued cost pressure from Indian market and despite being largely ‘overlooked’ by US based outsourcing providers, it is expected to proceed receiving its share of traditional high end software engineering and other IT services, from Western and Northern Europe. Many who experienced outsourcing there are characterizing Eastern Europe (Lithuania, Russia, Belarus, Ukraine, etc) as [a good place to find low cost, technically superb coders,.. generally hard workers, honest in answers to any your questions and strategically thinking].

Anyway, all these ratings of outsourcing locations are just generalization – anywhere you may find good and worse executors. As Gartner tips: “Don’t just seek the leaders – determine which vendors are the right fit for your organization”.

Well, perhaps very generally it would be a bad idea to hire designers from South East Asia if you expect a Western looking result :), still efficiency of an IT service provider should be checked in each particular case. There are a couple of advises helping to choose a good provider:

– Choose companies who have good feedback, ratings and recommendations. If a company follows market trends, makes marketing and technical researches, has good recommendations, especially from the companies from your geo-region, these all mark quite a solid level of credibility.

– Be careful about generic responses. This mostly concerns a stage when particular project details/requirements are already discussed. The tip considers both parties actually 🙂

– Start cooperation with a relatively small test/pilot project to evaluate provider’s competences. Altabel Group’s experience shows it’s natural for our clients to develop a pilot project with us to confirm our competences and then organically move on to Dedicated Development Team model for further cooperation.

– Try to meet your partners personally at initial stages of cooperation. Arrange short trips to visit a provider and especially meet your team members face to face.

– Think “potentially”. Keep contact information of those companies whose responses you liked for future references even if they do not fit your current project requirements.

And what are tips from personal experience? When does outsourcing have the best chances to succeed or fail? Do you have any preference in terms of a region to outsource from?

You are welcome to share your opinions here.

Kind regards,
Helen Boyarchuk – Business Development Manager (LI page)
Helen.Boyarchuk@altabel.com | Skype ID: helen_boyarchuk
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development


%d bloggers like this: