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Posts Tagged ‘IBM

It is expected that within the next 5-7 years there will be billions of devices connected to the Internet of Things (IoT). However, on the way to this bright future, there are certain practical barriers.

The traditional model of the Internet of Things requires a centralized system for data processing, which handles all the data from connected devices. Nevertheless, this approach is seriously flawed in terms of cost of lifecycle and business model in general. For example, a company that produces “smart TVs” should support a centralized processing infrastructure and data management of the device for more than 20 years. While it earns revenues only once, when selling this device. This imposes restrictions on the Internet of Things. So far it is available only in the premium devices or those that are rarely used.

Nowadays, most of the IT companies are competing in invention IoT platforms and systems.

IBM: Adept

IBM’s solution is to use the web’s most innovative p2p technologies to create distributed cloud environment which means that all the devices will be integrated together. Thus, every device will be self-sufficient for managing and will use distributed public infrastructure to communicate with other devices. In this way, producing company won’t have recurring costs in maintenance. Such a system will be stable for the lifetime of the devices, and it will be equal to its clouds. The network will be fully autonomous, while the device remains in it, without requiring the cost from producer. However, centralized control becomes almost impossible with all the potential billions of devices on the network.

Their system Adept will rely on three different technologies to resolve a number of issues related to IoT development and commercialization: Block chain, famous from the crypto currency bitcoin, will allow IoT devices to communicate and interact with one another, BitTorrent (provides a stable and capable data distribution system ) and Telehash (private messaging protocol with end-to-end encryption).

Apple: Homekit

Apple is not idle in the IoT field. They introduced a new ‘smart home’ platform – Homekit this summer (2014).

Homekit is a framework and network protocol for controlling devices in the home. It promises a seamless user interface for organizing and controlling connected devices, all part of iOS 8. As part of this announcement there is also a new microcontroller SoC (system on a chip), containing a low-power WiFi, ZigBee and Bluetooth. It combines what had been separate components into a fully integrated unit. As with many other Apple products you will need a certificate, in this case Apple’s MFi certification (Made for iPod, Made for iPhone, Made for iPad).

Google: Nest

In January 2014, Google showed its commitment to the emerging Internet of Things by purchasing Nest for $3.2 billion. Nest’s main product is a learning thermostat connected to the internet that uses sensors, regional data, and learning algorithms to preemptively change the temperature of your house automatically. Thus, Google gains a direct entry point into the home to collect data, learn, and possibly advertise to end users in the future. Google’s purchase of Nest was considered an important indicator that the Internet of Things is poised to explode.

Microsoft: Windows 8.1 for IoT

Microsoft does not want to be left behind and has its own plan to bring Windows Developers to the Internet of Things with its new version of Windows 8.1 – operating system tailored for the Internet of Things. This version of Windows is designed to use in microcomputers, wearable electronics, and possibly, toys and household gadgets. At this point the preliminary version is only available to developers. Windows 8.1 distribution for the Internet of things weighs only 174 MB. For comparison, the size distribution of the full version of Windows 8.1 is around 3 GB. Slim enough to work on a single-core processor Intel Quark with a clock frequency of just 400 MHz. But the boot time is poor – 2 minutes instead of the traditional 3-30 seconds.

Intel: Galileo

The first platform that is compatible with Windows 8.1 for the Internet of Things is Intel’s Galileo. It is built around a processor, Intel Quark has 256 MB of RAM, a slot for cards format SD, two ports USB, PCI Express interface and a network adapter Ethernet 10/100 Mbit / s, and a pocket friendly price of just $ 50.

Samsung: Smartthings, Smart Home

Samsung, Intel and Dell announced in July 2014 that they are combining forces to create a new wireless standard for the Internet of Things, connecting sensors, appliances and gadgets to the Internet in the home, business and automobile. The Open Internet Consortium will include hardware component builders Broadcom and Amtel as well as embedded software provider Wind River.

Also it would be unfair not to mention the fact that Samsung has bought an internet of things (IoT) company called Smartthings (the startup that makes smart-home controllers) for about $200 million. Samsung is planning to use it to bolster its smart home plans. Smartthings will run as an independent entity within Samsung, and will continue to support its existing customer base. This system provides a smartphone app that users can employ to control features and functions around the house.

Smart Home platform will provide users with three main services: Device Control, Home View, and Smart Customer Service. Device Control will allow users to access customized settings for all of their devices on their smartphone or on their Smart TV. Home View allows users to take advantage of the cameras built into many of Samsung’s connected appliances to take a look at what’s going on at home. Smart Customer Service will notify users whenever it’s time to service an appliance, and also provide assistance in after-sales servicing.

Other companies such as Vodafone, Cisco, MediaTek, etc are also a part of this great revolution in IT environment, and most of them have very prospective projects.

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IoT Top10 Companies

Nevertheless, one should accept that the Internet of Things requires some technical and educational level from the society, and while in some countries this seems to be difficult to put it into practice, the Scandinavian region, more specifically – Sweden, invests in such projects at the national level. The vision of its industry is to increase competitiveness and to use innovation effectively in such social spheres as healthcare, welfare and sport. Business life is focused on getting benefits by implementation of IoT technology as well.

The connected world is too big to belong to somebody exclusively. So will Apple, Windows, IBM, Oracle, Google and others be able to all work together in this IoT universe? Or will the grand idea of a seamlessly connected Internet of Things environment slip away?

Will be thankful to hear your opinion on this subject. Share your thoughts here in comments or send me a message.

 

Svetlana Pozdnyakova

Business Development Manager

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com

The IT sector is flourishing. If you’ve used a computer for at least a couple of times in the last few years, you’ve probably noticed this. I’ve noticed it myself even more after a business trip to Stockholm where I was lucky to attend some conferences and learnt more about Swedish IT industry tendencies. These tendencies reflect our life in general. Life changes rapidly with new technologies bursting into it. And when it comes to programming languages, we get a chance to see very different trendy styles. Programming languages which were popular some years ago are not useful today. And no one can exactly predict which programming language will be popular in future. That’s why a programmer who wants to stay in developer fields has to adopt the right programming language from time to time.

As the Swedish software maker Erik Starck pointed out, “programming is about managing complexities”. And it’s really so. An understanding of at least one programming language makes an impressive addition to any CV nowadays.

It is also very difficult to get the exact number of users for any programming language. Many of us use multiple programming languages. The more experience you have, the more programming languages you use. The more programs you write or work with, the chances of using more languages rise. The larger the company, the more languages you’re likely to use.

There are a number of ways to measure the popularity of a programming language, for example, based on the number of: 1) new applications written in the language; 2) existing applications written in the language; 3) developers that use the language primarily; 4) developers that use the language ever; 5) web searches; 6) available jobs that require skills in the language; 7) developers’ favorites, etc.

My survey attempts to rank which programming languages are most popular in Sweden, each using a different measure. So, they are the following:

1) Python

Python is an object-oriented programming language which allows developers to work quickly while integrating their systems more efficiently and effectively. Designed by Guido van Rossum in 1991, Python is one of the most easy to use programming languages.

Python is characterized by its use of indentation for readability, and its encouragement for elegant code by making developers do similar things in similar ways.

Top Employers: Amazon, Dell, Google, eBay, Instagram, Yahoo

2) Java

Java is a class-based, object-oriented programming language founded by Sun Microsystems in 1995. Java is one of the most in-demand programming languages today for many reasons. First of all, it is a well-organized language with a strong library of reusable software components. Secondly, programs written in Java can run on many different computer architectures and operating systems because of the use of the JVM (Java virtual machine).

Top Employers: Amazon, Deloitte, Sun, eBay, Symantec Corporation, Cisco Systems, Samsung

3) C++

C++ is a compiled, multi-paradigm language written as an update to C in 1979 by Bjarne Stroustrup.

Due to its high-level compatibility and object-orientation, C++ is used for developing a wide-range of applications and games which makes it a popular and sought after programming language by the employers.

Top Employers: Intel, the Math Works, Microsoft, Qualcomm, Amazon, Mozilla, Adobe, Volvo

4) Ruby

Ruby is an open source, dynamic programming language designed by Yukihiro Matsumoto in 1995 with a key focus on productivity and simplicity .It is one of the most object-oriented languages in the world.

Ruby is a mix of elegant syntax which is easy to read and write and hence it has attracted many organizations and developers.

Top Employers: Spokes, VMware, Accenture, Cap Gemini, Siemens, BBC, NASA

5) JavaScript

JavaScript is an object-oriented scripting language founded in 1995 by Netscape.

Being a client-side language, it runs in the web browser on the client-side with a simplified set of commands, easier code and no need for compilation.  JavaScript is simple to learn and it is used in millions of web pages to authenticate forms, detect browsers and improve design.

Top Employers: Microsoft, Sales Force, IBM, Yahoo, Dell

6) C#

C# is a compiled, object-oriented language developed by Microsoft.

It is highly used on Windows platform and labelled as the premium language for Microsoft .NET framework. C# is known for strong typing, procedural and functional programming discipline which is the reason it has acquired so much popularity.

Top Employers: Microsoft, HP, Digi-Key Corporation, Allscripts, Intel

Those are the top 6 programming languages which are in great demand among Swedish developers.

And one more thing: remember that opinions are like noses, everyone has one and they all smell 😉 If you disagree, please feel free to email me or write your own opinions in the comments.

 

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Business Development Manager

E-mail: Kate.Kviatkovskaya@altabel.com
Skype: kate.kviatkovskaya
LI Profile: Kate Kviatkovskaya

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com

About five years ago, no one had heard about jQuery. Today, we can say for sure, it is the most popular Javascript library in the world. The statistics clearly says for that fact: in the year 2012 jQuery was used by more than 50% of the top 10,000 websites in the world. That’s a massive endorsement by the world’s web developers 🙂 This kind of widespread adoption is rare for JavaScript libraries, even unprecedented. And the question is: what makes jQuery better than using one of the other (also excellent) JavaScript libraries? There certainly should be reasons for this. Let`s take a look at several of them:

– jQuery has vibrant and helpful community and it is easy to learn. jQuery has very good documentation, in addition there is a great number of tutorials on the web demonstrating jQuery usage. If you encounter a problem, you can ask a question on any web development forum and there will be a large development community waiting to help you :). Lots of people not only use it but also write tutorials, share their code, make plugins. Also jQuery has a very low learning curve.

– Widespread adoption. Countless big players on the Web are using jQuery: IBM, Netflix, Google (which both uses and hosts the jQuery library), and Microsoft, which now includes jQuery with its MVC framework and works with the open-source jQuery project to contribute new features to the jQuery library. Also there are thousands of big sites that use jQuery: among them are WordPress.com, Pinterest, Reddit, MSN.com, Amazon, Yandex, Microsoft.com, Instagram, Slideshare, the list can go further and further

– Cross-browser Compatibility. Cross-browser compatibility of jQuery is very successful. Most of the code you write will run exactly the same on all the major browsers. In fact, one of the biggest challenges in Ajax/JavaScript programming is cross-browser inconsistencies – it may drive the developer mad. For example, a design that renders perfectly on Internet Explorer , may not run that well on Mozilla Firefox,. So JQuery “fixed” this issue

– JQuery is simple. jQuery objects are chainable. JQuery objects return other jQuery objects and it is possible to perform additional operations in a chain. There is no need to iterate every object one by one.

– Small and clever core library. The jQuery core library is only about 24KB in size (Minified and Gzipped) so it can be easily included into your application and it`s very fast as well. That is due to the fact that a lot of fairly common functionality has been omitted from the jQuery core library, and relegated to the realm of the plugin. Also developers have even a smaller alternative: Sizzle. Sizzle library is 4 KB and it’s simplified just to be used for css selection.

– Great number of plug-ins. The reason of why there are so much jQuery plugins is that jQuery is designed to be pluggable. By including only a core set of features while providing a framework for extending the library, jQuery team made it easy to create plugins that can be reused in all jQuery projects as well as can be shared with other developers.

– CSS3 Selectors Compliant: jQuery fully supports the CSS3 selector specification.

– jQuery UI. jQuery User Interface separates out higher-level constructs and is packaged into a neat library that sits on top of jQuery. UI capabilities might not be stronger than some other libraries such as ExtJs but it’s getting better.

Hope these facts will be of use to you. Of course, the things I listed here might not include all the good points about jQuery and you may add your own points to the list 🙂
Thanks in advance!

Anna Kozik

Anna Kozik
Anna.Kozik@altabel.com
Skype ID: kozik_anna
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

WHAT

In today’s business and technology world you can’t have a conversation without touching upon the issue of big data. Some would say big data is a buzzword and the topic is not new at all. Still from my point of view recently, for the last two-three years, the reality around the data has been changing considerably and so it makes sense to discuss big data so hotly. And the figures prove it.

IBM reports we create 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every day. In 2011 our global output of data was estimated at 1.8 billion terabytes. What impresses it that 90 percent of the data in the world today was created in the past two years according to Big Blue. In the information century those who own the data and can analyze it properly and then use it for decision-making purpose will definitely rule the world. But if you don’t have the tools to manage and perform analytics on that never-ending flood of data, it’s essentially garbage.

Big data is not really a new technology, but a term used for a handful of technologies: analytics, in-memory databases, NoSQL databases, Hadoop. They are sometimes used together, sometimes not. While some of these technologies have been around for a decade or more, a lot of pieces are coming together to make big data the hot thing.

Big data is so hot and is changing things for the following reasons:
– It can handle massive amounts of all sorts of information, from structured, machine-friendly information in rows and columns toward the more human-friendly, unstructured data from sensors, transaction records, images, audios and videos, social media posts, logs, wikis, e-mails and documents,
– It works fast, almost instantly,
– It is affordable because it uses ordinary low-cost hardware.

WHY NOW

Big data is possible now because other technologies are fueling it:
-Cloud provides affordable access to a massive amount of computing power and to loads of storage: you don’t have to buy a mainframe and a data center, and pay just for what you use.
-Social media allows everyone to create and consume a lot of interesting data.
-Smartphones with GPS offer lots of new insights into what people are doing and where.
-Broadband wireless networks mean people can stay connected almost everywhere and all the time.

HOW

The majority of organizations today are making the transition to a data-driven culture that leverages data and analytics to increase revenue and improve efficiency. For this a complex approach should be taken, so called MORE approach as Avanade recommends:
-Merge: to squeeze the value out of your data, you need to merge data from multiple sources, like structured data from your CRM and unstructured data from social news feeds to gain a more holistic view on the point. The challenge here is in understanding which data to bring together to provide the actionable intelligence.
-Optimize: not all data is good data, and if you start with bad data, with data-driven approach you’ll just be making bad decisions faster. You should identify, select and capture the optimal data set to make the decisions. This involves framing the right questions and utilizing the right tools and processes.
-Respond: just having data does mean acting on it. You need to have the proper reporting tools in place to surface the right information to the people who need it, and those people then need the processes and tools to take action on their insights.
-Empower: data can’t be locked in silos, and you need to train your staff to recognize and act on big data insights.

And what is big data for your company? Why do you use it? And how do you approach a data-driven decision-making model in your organization?

Would be interesting to hear your point.

Helen Boyarchuk

Helen Boyarchuk
Helen.Boyarchuk@altabel.com
Skype ID: helen_boyarchuk
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

Before you read the article I would like to notice that it’s just a subjenctive opinion 🙂

So, what is PHP4 and ASP.Net? ASP.NET – is not a continuation of ASP, but is conceptually a new Microsoft technology, created as part of ideology. NET. Key stakeholders of .NET are scalability, cross-language interaction and shaky concept of “safe programming”.

PHP is conversely an open and free technology. Of course, it would be wrong to decipher PHP as Personal Home Page today, but we still can hear echoes from the past to these days. PHP is a scripting language, created exclusively for dynamic HTML output. This does not mean that it is impossible to create a major project, this means that a large project for PHP is expensive and difficult.

Programming in PHP does not require an expensive programming environment. It would be enough a textbook to learn how to write more or less workable scripts. But it doesn’t work with ASP.NET. There is nothing to do without Visual Studio, MSDN and sometimes access to internet. Most part of time anovice developer spends on studying MSDN. By that time when he have learnt heaped model of classes and all the necessary functions, Microsoft probably will come up with something new. But if you could learn it…

Using ASP.NET with Visual Studio it looks like to work with Delphi. The main languages ​​in which applications written in ASP.NET are Visual Basic.NET and C #, respectively, are the heirs Visual Basic и Java/C++.Theoretically, under ASP.NET, you can write programs in any language for which there is a corresponding compiler. However, in practice, to create ASP.NETapplications are mainly used Visual Basic.NET and C #. “Native” environment of ASP.NET is IIS, running Windows. And yes, IIS is not known as the most stable web server, and Windows – is not the most stable operating system.

ASP.NET does not suit for small projects, and even more – for a few triggered groups that do not require precise control. The causes are many – from the high cost of the platform and ending with the complexity of the model classes.NET. When you collide with .Net you could think who could understand and learn it all? But then you understand – nobody. The credo of .Net is not to go to own business, write your module, learn its functions, know your place – this principle works fine in the collective .

In the ideology of Microsoft a programmer is a small cog in a well-established mechanism, singles have never been considered. Thus large projects accrue for .Net.

Thus there are no places for PHP programmers in such projects. Why? Because they will require a lot of coordinators, who must be paid. Most part of coordination in .Net takes over itself. PHP technology is fundamentally different from ASP.NET. PHP resembles a mixture of C and Perl with a little spice of Basic and Pascal. But ASP.Net looks like a classic

PHP4 trusts developers so much and there are no types, to declare variables is not necessary. PHP syntax is made for a quick and simple solution of common problems. The entire responsibility of dangerous stunts belongs to the programmer, what in particular leads to the widespread phenomenon, as the discovering of serious errors in the code one month after delivery of the project. The sphere of PHP is not large, it is small projects, which developed by either one specialist or a closely work group . As PHP is free the language has become an ideal choice for SMB or copyrights

Speed. Theoretically, ASP.NET must run faster as we deal with once compiled binary code, whereas PHP-scripts are re-processed each time. However, PHP work on IIS and Apache with a great load (although artificially induced) and always produces better results than ASP.NET even better then .ASP classic.The ligament PHP + MySQL + Apache works better and faster than ASP.NET + IIS + Microsoft SQL Server 2000.

Does it mean that ASP.NET is worse? I don’t think so. The speed is assured that all PHP applications run in a single address space, when ASP.NET checks and double checks the data repeatedly, keeping each application in a separate address space.The first pproach is faster but less reliable, the second – is more reliable, but there is a price. Unfortunately miracles do not happen L.

About work . Briefly describe the feeling to work with PHP it is constant process of debugging this is to the fact that the language contributes serious logical errors.

Even primitive typo (highlighted in red) leads to a logical error, which would not be in C# in principle. In general, there is not any declaration of variables in PHP, which is a big minus.

Also as a rule, updating version of PHP on the server is a headache for customers and programmers. Sometimes it is very difficult to find a mistake, especially if it appears only under certain circumstances, so that it could be never revealed to the delivery of the project. It is strength and weakness of PHP. When you plan in C# and write different classes , interfaces for collections to create a page in one fell swoop for ten minutes then. In PHP you could create the page several. Still every next page is created in 10 mins on ASP.Net when in PHP you would spend the same time again and again.. If you need to change smth on the page visually, you would need 5 mins in ASP.Net, but in PHP you would need look for and change HTML.

Thus small and medium projects are fate for small groups of PHP programmers; when medium and medium and large – the inheritance of large groups, using products of Microsoft, and giant projects share between HP, IBM, Sun, Oracle, and prices are too higher, but this is another story J

Thus in conclusion I would like to notice at the beginning pace of ASP.Net development should fall sharply, then grow steadily and eventually stop at a certain level, whereas the opposite is true in PHP.

Thank you for your attention!

Kind regards,
Elvira Golyak – Business Development Manager (LI page)
Elvira.Golyak@altabel.com | Skype ID: elviragolyak
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

IBM engineer Mark Dean, who helped design the first personal computer, recently proclaimed that the PC was dead. Also of note: Google some weeks ago bought Motorola Mobility, not a PC maker. Are you ready to trade in your desktop or laptop for a tablet or Smartphone?

Some interesting thoughts from LI members bellow:

«I do not think the PC will be dead any time soon. You cannot compare a tablet or even a Smartphone to what you can do with a PC or Laptop. At least not until both are as powerful as a PC or laptop, and have peripheral ports for external monitors and input devices.
I have used a laptop as my main computer for about 7 years, but last year decided to move back to a PC setup. It was faster, and less noisy. I am glad I made that choice.
Some people and companies envision that the PC will give way to a ‘thin client’ that will hook up to the internet and access everything from there as SaaS applications. I doubt that will happen any time soon either. I do not think I’m the only one if I say that I like to be in absolute control over my PC and what is on it. I decide if I want to go online, and do not want to be forced to go online because of SaaS software that requires it. And I do not want to store anything in the cloud either, because there is no one I trust more with the data I own, than myself.»
Jeroen Wierda

« I use both a MacBook (a great PC) for desk use & long work sessions and an iPad for on the road presentations, checking email and reading eBooks. I use just a simple flip-phone for voice calls since the iPad is so much better (internet and emails) due to the large screen.
Both are types of PCs and I don’t see them disappearing any time soon. We will see new forms (smaller) and applications but personal computers will be around for a long time in one shape or another…»
Bryan C Webb
President/CEO

«The future is convergence, where one mobile device, perhaps with docking to support peripherals, is all we need. Motorla’s Atrix is a step in that direction. Before long time most of us won’t need peripherals. Cloud technologies, which eliminate the need for disk drives, are another step. Do we really need printers? If it’s stored electronically why do you need to print it? Scanners? Cameras are getting to the point where they can do that. Mouse? More accurate than finger on a tiny screen, but that will improve. Keyboard? I used to type 90 wpm, and that was on a manual typewriter with no correction capability. I’m not about to give that up. But voice recognition, etc. will soon kill the archaic QWERTY keyboard. Thumb pads on Smartphones have already eliminated it for many people. Bottom line, the PC is on the way out. But it isn’t dead yet.»
Don Strayer
Owner, Don Strayer Consulting LLC

«Absolutely not, the PC, Tablets and Smartphones have different markets and applications. But of course, what it is happening is that many people is discovering that with Tablet or Smartphone, they don’t need any netbook, laptop or PC only for surfing, sharing pictures with friends and playing some casual games in their spare time.
If I should bet for something, I would bet for a Smartphone/Tablet for mobility (depends of how big you want/need your screen), and probably a Laptop (PC/MAC) as main computer, with an external wireless Monitor/Keyboard/Mouse at office/home»
Ivan Salinas
Engineer and Musician

«Depends on the user. Yes I can access a lot of info from my Smartphone but there are a lot of technical applications that need a PC with a large screen. Ever try to use AutoCad to design a mechanical part using a phone or tablet PC? What about an electrical schematic or floor plan? How about writing large documents/manuals/etc without a full-size keyboard?
Sales to the average consumer/homeowner may have reached saturation but business and industry still require the workhorse PC.»
Tat Chiu

And what do think? Has the PC outlived its usefulness?

Best Regards,

Kristina Kozlova

Marketing Manager

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com


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