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“Computer programming is an art, because it applies accumulated knowledge to the world, because it requires skill and ingenuity, and especially because it produces objects of beauty.”
Donald Knuth, 1974

 

It’s better to start your journey into the career of programming by answering the question “Do you really need programming?” This question does not apply to those, who majored in computer programming or was close to it. If at school you were good at math, if you like to spend a lot of time sitting in front of the computer, if you want to learn something new, then programming is for you. What is more, this area is now in demand and highly paid in the world, job vacancies for the post of programmers are always open. Isn’t it the best time to be a programmer? 🙂

Everyone knows that the future programmer should be able to think broadly and to present the project from different perspectives before its implementation and realization. Unfortunately, the machine does not understand a human language. Of course, I’m not talking about Siri and other voice recognition — I’m talking about the creation of new software. To create the calculator, the computer needs to be given the task in the same way as the foreman explains to workers how to lay bricks. That’s why you can’t do anything without understanding the programming languages. Well, first you need to decide what kind of programming languages we should start with.

And here everyone chooses a language which will be useful for him. It depends on the kind of products you are going to develop. Most of us studied Turbo Pascal at school, and it’s no news that this language is practically not used anymore. So, if you want to join the team of programmers in the nearest future, the choice of language should be made sensibly.

Among the most popular programming languages in 2016 are Java, followed by C languages, then Python, JavaScript, PHP, Ruby, etc. It should come as no surprise that the more popular language is, the more chances you have to find work in the future. So, you’d better start with Java or C#, as these are the best paid and relatively simple learning languages of writing code. If you can’t cope with them, then you should try to learn Python. This language suits for quick and effective programming.

But if you have no programming experience at all you can start with something more simple for understanding. Good examples can be the basics of HTML and CSS.

Why? These two languages are essential for creating static web pages. HTML (Hypertext Markup Language) structures all the text, links, and other content you see on a website. CSS is the language that makes a web page look the way it does—color, layout, and other visuals we call style. Well, if you are interested in making websites, you should definitely start with HTML and CSS.

Let’s move to JavaScript. It is the first full programming language for many people. Why? It is the next logical step after learning HTML and CSS. JavaScript provides the behavior portion of a website. For example, when you see that a form field indicates an error, that’s probably JavaScript at work.

JavaScript has become increasingly popular, and it now lives outside web browsers as well. Learning JavaScript will put you in a good place as it becomes a more general-purpose language.

Some people also suggest choosing Python as the first programming language because Python’s program code is readable, first of all. You don’t even need to be a programmer to understand what is happening in the program. Due to the simple syntax of Python you will need less time for writing programs than in Java, for example. A huge base of libraries will save you a lot of strength, nerves and time. Large technology companies are working with Python: Yandex, Google, Facebook and YouTube. It is used for web applications, game development, software for servers.

Java can also be a good choice for a beginner. This language is more popular than Python, but a bit more complicated. At the same time, the development tools are much better designed. Java is one of the most popular languages for the backend development of modern enterprise web applications. It is used in Amazon, eBay, LinkedIn and Yahoo! With Java and the frameworks based on it, developers can create scaling web apps for a wide range of users. Java is also the primary language used for developing Android applications for smart phones and tablets. Moreover, after Java you will be able to work with low level programming languages.

PHP is one more popular language. The PHP language, along with databases (e.g. MySQL) is an important tool for creating modern web applications. Most of the sites developed on PHP are focused on a large amount of data. It is also a fundamental technology of powerful content management systems like WordPress. There are no normal imports in PHP, there are many solutions to one and the same problem. And it makes training more complicated.

 

 
The languages C and C# are a bit complicated for a beginner. But if you develop software for embedded systems, work with system kernels or just want to squeeze out every last drop from all available resources, C is what you need.

Ruby has begun to gain popularity since 2003, when the framework Rails appeared. Used widely among web startups and big companies alike, Ruby and Rails jobs are pretty easy to come by. Ruby and Rails make it easy to transform an idea into a working application, and they have been used to bring us Twitter, GitHub, and Treehouse.

Choosing a programming language may still seem challenging. It shouldn’t. You can’t go wrong. As long as you choose a language that is regularly used in technology today, you’re winning. When you are starting out, the goal is to become solid in the basics, and the basics are pretty similar across almost all modern programming languages.

Part of learning to code is learning a language’s syntax (its grammatical or structural rules). A much bigger part of learning to code, the part that takes longer and gives you more headaches, is learning to solve problems like a programmer. You can learn the grammatical structure of the English language pretty quickly; however, you won’t truly understand the language until you put that grammatical structure to use in a conversation. The same is true in programming. You want to learn the core concepts in order to solve problems. Doing this in one language is similar to doing it in another. Because the core concepts are similar from language to language, I recommend sticking with whichever language you choose until your understanding of the core concepts is solid. If you have a clear idea of your reasons for learning to program, and know exactly what you want to accomplish with your new coding skills, then you’ll be able to make the right choice.

How did you guys get into programming? What are the best programming languages for first-time learners?

Please, share with us your experience and opinion here below 🙂

 

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Kate Kviatkovskaya

Business Development Manager

E-mail: Kate.Kviatkovskaya@altabel.com
Skype: kate.kviatkovskaya
LI Profile: Kate Kviatkovskaya

 

altabel

Altabel Group

Professional Software Development

E-mail: contact@altabel.com
www.altabel.com

Debates about which programming language is the best are always hard and heated. Likewise, there’s no ideal language that works for all web application project requirements. Wikipedia is written in PHP. Gmail is written in Java. Python is number one choice of Google and YouTube. Ruby is used to create Twitter and Hulu. Slashdot is written in Perl. Stackoverflow is written in C#.

Browsing for the best web programming languages, among dynamic ones, you’ll mostly see PHP, Python and Ruby listed. Back in the days several years ago PHP was admitted the best tool for web job but since then both Python and Ruby have matured and grown robust libraries and frameworks around them that make them better candidates for many web projects now.

Today many consider PHP to be great for average everyday web systems. Python and Ruby are thought to be more suitable than PHP for most web applications in general and for more advanced things in particular. Just like PHP, they are free, open source, run on an open source stack (Apache and Nginx / linux, windows and BSD), and play well with any database engine. However, Ruby and Python have better syntax and they both enforce good programming habits by their nature, especially Python. PHP encourages sloppy spaghetti code by its nature. Also, the object oriented features in PHP are very ugly because of its arcane, retarded syntax.

Let’s get deeper insights into these two web programming languages from various standpoints:

As mentioned before, Python and Ruby are two of the most popular dynamic programming languages used in high level application development. In fact, Ruby was built using some of the design elements from Python. Developers often prototype using these two languages before implementing on compiled languages because of their modularity and object oriented features. Many use Python or Ruby instead of Perl as simple scripting languages. Python and Ruby are popular among web developers as well because of their rapid development cycle, with Python boasting computation efficiencies and Ruby boasting code design.

a/ Philosophy
Python really believes that code readability is the most important thing. Hence, there is one-true way of writing code, or as it has been reformulated lately: “There’s a most understandable way to do something and that is how it should be done”. Python is designed to strongly emphasize programmer productivity and it likes things to be structured, consistent, and simple. Python syntax enforces strict indentation rules; in fact, indentation has semantic meaning in Python.
Ruby believes in giving programmer the flexibility, freedom and power. It was designed, first and foremost, to make programming fun for its creator, with guiding concepts as follow: “The Principle of Least Surprise” and “There’s more than one way to do the same thing”. The latter philosophy principle inherited from Perl is the reason why many Ruby methods have alternate names, which may lead to some API confusion among new practitioners. However, this flexibility enables Ruby to be used as a meta language for describing DSL. Also Ruby provides a better way to write concise and compact code. More into the expressiveness of the code and writing code that is clever.
Python people like libraries to be transparent and obvious how they work and hence is easier to learn, while Ruby people tend to provide clean and pretty interfaces with “magic” behind the scenes. This makes development very fast when you understand the magic, but frustrating when you don’t.

b/ Ease of Use
Python is known for its ease of use. It allows beginners to start building powerful sites more quickly, and has the power to grow in complexity keeping its ease of comprehension. For example, one of the hardest parts of coding is going back to what you coded long ago and trying to remember the logic of it. Because Python uses natural language with white spaces and indenting, it is much more clear and easier to read than languages like Ruby. That makes it easier to fix mistakes or do updates. Also, there are literally thousands of pre-built modules that can be snapped on to let you get up and running on the web immediately. Its intuitive introduction to object-oriented coding concepts, such as communities, modules, and libraries, allows you to move on to other related programming languages as they develop.

c/ Object Oriented Programming
Both Python and Ruby support object oriented programming. Still Ruby’s object orientation is considered to be more ‘pure’ in that all functions exist inside a class of some sort. Python’s object orientation is more akin to that of C++, which allows functions and statements that exist outside of classes. In Ruby, even global variables are actually embedded within the ObjectSpace object. Python doesn’t have global variables, instead using attributes of module objects. In Python and Ruby, an instance of literally any type is an object. However, where in Ruby all functions and most operators are in fact methods of an object, in Python functions are first-class objects themselves.

d/ Syntax
Ruby includes several syntactic features which make dynamic extension of and higher-order interaction with external (library) code more straightforward. In particular these are blocks and mix-ins. Most things implementable with block and mix-in syntax are also achievable in Python, they are simply less syntactically natural and clear, and so less commonly form the centerpiece of major libraries or common styles of programming. These features, combined with a lighter-weight syntax with fewer restrictions (whitespace flexibility, optional parentheses, etc), make Ruby more suitable to pervasive and relatively transparent use of metaprogramming.
At the same time, while this flexibility and the Ruby community’s tendency to use it for metaprogramming can facilitate aesthetically pleasing code, they can also create stylistic variation in how the language is used, and obscure the mechanisms by which code actually works. Python’s more restrictive syntax is intentionally designed to steer developers towards one canonical “pythonic” style to improve accessibility and comprehension.

e/ Style
Ruby code is organized into blocks, with blocks starting with various constructs and ending with the keyword “end”. Python code is indentation-sensitive, with successively larger indentation meaning tighter (nested) scopes. Python’s syntax has been described as executable pseudocode.

f/ Functional Programming
Both languages support some functional programming constructs, but Ruby is arguably better suited to a functional programming style. Lambdas in Python are generally very short, because lambdas in Python are restricted to expressions and cannot contain statements. Ruby’s lambda support is far more flexible, allowing for lambda expressions of arbitrary length.

g/ Speed
The standard CPython implementation is generally regarded as executing code slightly faster than Ruby.If speed is really an issue for a Python project, you also have the option to use Cython, Pyrex,Pypy (JIT) or the ShedSkin tools to compile your code into C or C++.

j/ Features
Both Python and Ruby are high level application development languages. Each of them is estimated to have a Capers Jones language level of at least 15. Both languages promote test driven development.
Both languages have full Unicode support, although the way that support is implemented varies. Python distinguishes between “Unicode strings” and “byte-strings”. Ruby, on the other hand, treats all strings as byte-strings with a semi-hidden flag which causes problems when dealing with badly-encoded data from third-party sources.
Both Python and Ruby support multithreading. Python has the Global Interpreter Lock (GIL), which negates much of the potential advantage of using threads; Ruby has a comparable Global VM Lock (GVL).
There are a number of functions that are available by default in Ruby but for which in Python it is necessary to import a module from the standard library. Python supports generators and generator expressions.

k/ Community
There are great communities behind both frameworks. Some people believe that Python has a more developed community in terms of libraries suited for data analysis, machine learning, natural language processing, scientific libraries. As for community folks, Python ones are believed to be conservative and afraid of change, while Ruby guys welcome changes and love new shiny stuff even if it breaks older things. Consequently, Python world is more stable, and you can update your installation without much troubles, but that also means new technology is only added very slowly.

l/ Frameworks
There are a number of Web frameworks based on both Ruby and Python. The most notable and leading are Ruby on Rails (Ruby) and Django (Python) based on MVC. Django is more declarative, with it you’ll have a clearer understanding of what’s actually going on. It lets you specify most configuration details yourself. Django creates a much simpler project structure. On the other hand, the centerpiece of Rails’s philosophy is called convention over configuration. Rails provides you with more defaults.

m/ Popularity
Python is generally more widely used than Ruby, according to most measures, but in the wake of the rising popularity of the Ruby on Rails Web application development framework Ruby’s popularity too has seen rapid growth.
Python is more mature general purpose nature vs Ruby’s more niche (Rails) usage. Python is stronger and sees use in automating system administration and software development, web application development, data manipulation, analyzing scientific data (with help of numpy, scipy, and matplotlib modules), biostatistics, and teaching introductory computer science and programming. Ruby+Rails holds a slight edge over Python+Django for web development and sees use in general programming, and has more mindshare.
In terms of cloud deployment, Python can run on Google-Cloud (Google-App engine). Though Ruby has very strong cloud deployment options in the shape of Heroku and Engine Yard.

Would you prefer Python or Ruby over PHP for implementation of your web project? And is it indeed a philosophy that you chose while selecting between Python and Ruby? Interested to hear your thoughts.

Helen Boyarchuk

Helen Boyarchuk
Helen.Boyarchuk@altabel.com
Skype ID: helen_boyarchuk
Business Development Manager (LI page)
Altabel Group – Professional Software Development

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